Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of November 14, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Gladys McLean

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


November 17, 2016

The Leominster Champion: MWCC programs on target for meeting future job needs

Today, another group of students is receiving its certificates in Industry Readiness from the Advanced Manufacturing program at Mount Wachusett Community College at its Devens campus.

The graduates are a diverse group ranging in age from 19 to 56. Some are looking to begin their careers, while others are looking for a fresh start. What they all have in common is the foresight to take advantage of a free six-week program that gives them the skills needed in today’s advanced manufacturing workplace.

[…]John Henshaw, dean of workplace development at MWCC is also quick to note the MWCC program has an 80 percent placement rate with students.

“We have a proven track record of getting our graduates good jobs,” he said. “Our programs have excellent content, great equipment for hands-on learning, and a dedicated staff of instructors. The value added is that we also provide training, support, and counseling to help graduates find jobs.”

Democrat and Chronicle: Free job training part of $6M grant to MCC

Monroe Community College has been awarded a $6 million federal grant to increase tuition-free education and training programs for in-demand jobs.

[…]This funding will be used to establish and expand innovative partnerships between community colleges and other training providers.

[…] By encouraging regional collaboration and delivering on the promise of tuition-free training at community colleges, these grants will help strengthen local communities across America,” said Labor Secretary Thomas Perez, in a statement about the grants.

November 16, 2016

The Boston Herald: Program aims to help low-income parents get jobs

Community Labor United, a group that collaborates with local trade unions and community groups, is launching a new program to help low-income parents get job training to enter high-paying hospitality and trade jobs, and to get childcare.

The Independent Women’s Project — a partnership with Brookview House, Building Pathways and others — wants to remove obstacles both mothers and fathers face when trying to work, mainly access to affordable childcare to cover their often irregular hours. The program is designed to get construction and hospitality industries and childcare providers to team up and come up with ways to support workers.

 

November 13, 2016

The Union: Retail ready: Jobs training available through new Hospitality House thrift store

For the past two years, Hospitality House has operated a culinary training program in which “students” work in the shelter’s commercial kitchen. Now, there is a new job training program available to HH guests. Earlier this summer, Hospitality House opened a thrift store which is used to teach skills needed to succeed in the retail sales industry.

“We use whatever means we have to help give them job skills,” explained Debbie McDonald, HH Development Director, who oversees education, fundraising and communications.

[…]Hospitality House is the only emergency homeless shelter in Nevada County, offering 54 beds throughout most of the year and expanding to 69 beds in winter. The men, women and children who stay there are referred to as guests. They receive vouchers they can spend at Bread and Roses.

“We are a shelter that provides pathways to housing. We are not a destination. We help people remove obstacles to housing. One of those obstacles can be the lack of job skills,” added McDonald.

November 12, 2016

The Daily News: Kreher’s first farm to join veterans jobs program

Kreher’s Farm in Clarence, a major egg and organic grain producer with operations across western New York, is the first farm in the state to be approved for a new on-the-job agribusiness training initiative for military veterans.

The initiative, an outgrowth of a workgroup formed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo in 2014, takes an identified need for opportunities serving veterans interested in pursuing careers in farming and agriculture. Cornell’s Small Farms Program team paired with the State Department of Veteran’s Affairs to expand existing DVA programs in skilled trades industries like electrical and plumbing.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of November 7, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Gladys McLean

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


November 9, 2016

The State Journal-Register: Goodwill launches employment program for veterans

Land of Lincoln Goodwill Industries has established a VetLink employment program for military veterans, including referrals to financial, educational, transportation, childcare and housing services.

Land of Lincoln President and CEO Sharon Durbin said in an announcement the program is a natural extension of the Goodwill job-training mission.

[…]The program provides one-on-one career guidance, including job-skill evaluations, setting employment goals, and developing education and training programs. Veterans who complete the program also will be helped with professional clothing for interviews, according to the announcement.

The Pasadena Journal: Saving Our Young Black Men – Connected Youth to Jobs

The Pasadena Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. recently concluded the inaugural Saving Our Young Black Men Job Skills Training Program – Connecting You to Jobs. The program targeted 18-21 year old young men (and women). It focused on providing skillsets that they need for life long success. The concept of this program is to hold a hand out to give a hand up.

[…]The Job Skills Training Program, taught by Casswell Goodman, gets our young adults ready for the job market by teaching them how to fill out effective job applications, put together job winning resumes and learn how to successfully interview in order to win jobs. The free program provided each participant that completed the training with a free suit, a $25 gift card and the opportunity to test and certify through the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce to have access to a database of over 600 jobs.

November 4, 2016

Herald and Review: Now they’re cooking: Homeless men get much-needed job skills from culinary class

Bernard Sangster was looking for a new direction for his life when he got out of jail this summer.

So the offer he got while staying at the Salvation Army was too good to pass up, and that was to enroll in the shelter’s Culinary Arts Program that started Aug. 31. Sangster said he knew his way around a barbecue grill but didn’t know anything else about cooking.

Part-way through the eight-week class, he earned his food service sanitation manager certification and landed a job running the broiler at Cheddar’s.

[…]Two previous eight-week sessions produced 13 graduates, 10 of whom were able to earn that all-important certification. Six did so this time around, and the remaining three plan to take the test again Nov. 18.

Two other graduates, in addition to Sangster, found jobs while taking the training.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of October 31, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Gladys McLean

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


November 3, 2016

KENS5 San Antonio: New job training program opens on east side

Kendra Franklin and Tamika Young are women on a mission. They say they will finish their training to become Certified Nursing Assistants and then keep right on learning. Franklin said she would like to become a doctor. Young said she wants to inspire her children to pursue higher education and great careers.

They are both involved in a training program sponsored by Alamo Colleges.

[…]It’s called the Eastside Education & Training Center and it has brought new life to an old school building.

The program is located in what used to be Pfeiffer Elementary, an SAISD school.

After a $1.5 million grant-funded upgrade, the new center is expected to welcome its first class of students on November 14.

Students who qualify will receive free tuition, books, supplies, childcare, and transportation assistance

November 2, 2016

Santee Patch: Inmates to Plant Trees in Lakeside Under Job Training Program

A job training program at the East Mesa Detention and Re-Entry Facility is taking root at San Diego County parks. Trees and plants that were cultivated and grown at the jail’s greenhouse will be planted at five parks across the county this month, including the morning of Nov. 3 at El Monte County Park.

The program started in July 2014 to help inmates develop skills and work habits needed to secure honest employment after their release. Gardening can be therapeutic and gives inmates a sense of purpose while serving time behind bars. The work they do for County Parks also helps inmates build healthier connections with the community.

October 31, 2016

The Journal: Learning Center focuses on medical, industrial trades

The Unlimited Learning Center in Cortez has revamped its adult education program to focus on the industrial trades in addition to its career training in the medical fields.

“We offer specific pathways to careers that pay well so people have a better chance of getting a sustainable job in the area,” said director Anne Miller. “We’re open to anyone in the community — people who have been laid off, want to find a new job or go back to school.”

[…] Miller said the Center recognizes there is an education gap for many adults which prevents them from succeeding in the difficult course work and testing required to become certified in medical and industrial trades.

Basic math, English, and science courses for GED and college entrance exams are free. Pell grants are available for college courses. The Learning Center also offers free childcare.

Northern Nevada Business Weekly: Reno retail center gets facelift with the help of Sierra Nevada Job Corps Center students

The retail center just south of the Plumb Lane and South Virginia Street intersection is in the process of getting an upgrade…While the remodeling of retail centers throughout the region has started to become a trend for owners to attract and retain tenants, this particular project has a unique aspect to it.

Coldwell Banker Commercial partnered with Sierra Nevada Job Corps Center to give nearly a dozen students the opportunity to get hands-on construction experience while also paying the students for their work. The students worked under the supervision of Coldwell Banker Commercial’s in-house General Contractor, GPS Property Maintenance & Construction LLC.

The program is for people “who want to get ahead in life,” Mark Huntley, business and community liaison for Sierra Nevada Job Corps Center, said.

They offer 15 trades including culinary arts, electrical, office administration, hotel and lodging, automotive, medical administrative assistant and more. It is a two-year program that also provides students free housing, food and medical care.

 

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of October 24, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Gladys McLean

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


October 28, 2016

North Kentucky Tribune: Brighton Center 50 Years, 50 Stories; CET student learns she is ‘good enough,’ can be a contributor

As part of its 50th Anniversary Celebration this year, Brighton Center has introduced a “50 Years, 50 Stories” series to highlight some of the customers, volunteers, donors, community partners or supporters who are part of its history.

“I have always had hopes and dreams, but I never believed so many would become a reality” Samantha

I was working a temp job that I hated because it was far too physically strenuous for my body to handle, and a co-worker took the time to notice my pain and asked me why I didn’t get an office job. I replied that I didn’t have the skills, and she told me about CET.

[…]The Conflict Management workshop really impressed upon me the wisdom to say, ‘It’s not you versus me, it’s us versus the problem;’ a perspective which has become common in my household during disagreements

October 27, 2016

Community Idea Stations: Recovery, Job Training and a Network of Support at the Healing Place

Between 65 and 70% of clients who complete the recovery program are still sober one year later, according to staff. Even with a successful recovery model, Healing Place alumni faced another challenge – getting a job, says Development Officer Clara Stokes.

Clara Stokes: Our clients were getting out there, had a year of sobriety under their belt, decided to go get a job which they have to have to sustain themselves and doors were being slammed in their face. They didn’t know how to talk about gaps in in employment so they would self-sabotage and end up back in the Sobering up Center.

After searching the country for effective models, the Healing Place started “Works” specifically designed for people facing barriers to employment. They offer skills assessment, resume building, computer classes and mock interviews. There’s sessions on budgeting and building credit. And, they work on establishing a strong character through communication and conflict resolution.

 

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of October 17, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Gladys McLean

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


October 18, 2016

LA Daily News: City Council Members Propose Pairing Housing, Job Training for Homeless

Two City Council members Tuesday proposed a pilot program intended to give homeless individuals a better and more permanent path off the streets by matching them up with both job training and housing subsidies.

[…] Each participant would get temporary vouchers to pay for housing at the same time they are receiving training and paid work experience, which is meant to prepare them for a more permanent job.

The council members say their proposal is based on the idea that it might be more effective to provide housing and job assistance together, rather than separately. Those who receive the usual six months of housing assistance may find themselves back on the streets if they cannot secure a stable source of income, while someone who does not have a stable place to stay may find it difficult to maintain a steady job, according to their motion.

October 17, 2016

McDowell News: Manufacturing class seeks new funding

Christal Padgett is one of those in McDowell whose life has been changed because of a class. A single mother of three children, Padgett worked at a scrap metal yard until she fell and broke her foot. She told The McDowell News she wasn’t able to work and couldn’t return to her old job because of this injury. As she was filing for unemployment, Padgett learned about a manufacturing certification class offered through McDowell Technical Community College.

[…] For two years, McDowell Tech has offered this class in manufacturing certification, which is based out of the N.C. Works Career Center on Baldwin Avenue. Those who successfully complete this six-week class are able to make connections with local manufacturers and earn safety certification with the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). They can also earn certification in first-aid/CPR, career readiness and Microsoft Digital literacy and gaining an introduction to advanced manufacturing skills. Plant tours, job interviews, on-the-job training and apprenticeships are also available through this class. The class focuses on helping participants boost their attitude, initiative and attendance, said participants.

Westword: Heritage Food Incubator Comal Opens at TAXI

Comal’s mission goes far beyond providing Denver with home-style Mexican eats; the restaurant is part of a community-outreach project from nonprofit organization Focus Points, aimed at giving residents of the Globeville and Elyria-Swansea neighborhoods the job training they need to move forward with their careers. “Focus Points’ mission is to build communities by strengthening families,” says executive director Steven Moss, and to that end, the organization supports education initiatives, pre-schools, GED programs and economic development opportunities, with the goal of helping people in Denver’s low-income communities find stable jobs with good incomes.

[…] “This is a group of entrepreneurs with a passion for cooking. Focus Points asked: ‘How do we take this to the next level?’ In order to move to the next level, these women needed a kitchen.” says Focus Points’ director of economic and workforce development, Slavica Park.

The organization partnered with Zeppelin Development to secure that kitchen, taking over the old Fuel space. A cohort of community members will spend eight months there learning the nuts and bolts of how to operate a restaurant, with the goal of eventually opening their own restaurants or catering companies, or securing work in higher-end commercial kitchens.

October 15, 2016

New Haven Register: New Haven’s EMERGE serves ex-offender community with jobs, hope

As executive director for EMERGE, Jusino oversees a comprehensive program that, in addition to providing job training for construction, landscaping and property management positions, assists male and female ex-offenders with other services such as high school-level classes, group discussion sessions, parenting groups and job-training services. His program is the only one of its kind in the state.

[…] “All they believe they need is a job,” Jusino said. “Our goal is to kind of play on that. That they need a job to get them to do things they historically have not wanted to do…They don’t want to do literacy, they don’t want to get mental health (assistance), they don’t want to do occupational skills training, they don’t want to begin to explore the process of how they make decisions,” Jusino said.

So in order to get some individuals to buy in to the program, Jusino said they essentially strike a deal with prospective members: They leverage their ability to place them on payroll to participate in the additional services.

The entire process starts with an orientation that usually weeds out a majority of those in attendance. EMERGE is selective, relying on an interviewing process. EMERGE then pays individuals $10.10 an hour to work up to 24 hours a week. They are paid for 24 hours, but must make a 40-hour commitment. The remaining time must be used to attend classes and participate in additional services.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of October 10, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Gladys McLean

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


October 10, 2016

Fox59: Second Helpings offers free culinary job training to central Indiana residents

Unemployed or underemployed adults in central Indiana can receive free culinary job training through Second Helpings. Second helpings is an organization that rescues prepared and perishable food, prepares it into nutritious meals, and distributes those meals to 80 social services organizations that feed hungry people.

October 6, 2016

US Department of Labor: A New Start in New Haven

Last month, I [Secretary of Labor, Tom Perez] had the privilege of seeing Labor Department investments in action at the New Haven Correctional Center in Connecticut. They have taken advantage of a program called Linking to Employment Activities Pre-Release, or LEAP, which enables people who are paying their debts to society to get job skills before they are released, as well as help with housing and transportation.

[…]During my stop in Connecticut, I met a young man named Liam who is nearing the end of a 20-month sentence. Liam passed me a note during the discussion to tell me what the program has meant to him:

Dear Secretary of Labor,

My name is Liam [last name withheld for privacy reasons]. I wish to tell you what the Job Alliance means to me, this is the best by far program I have ever been involved in, [they’re] giving me a chance at a new beginning, teaching me that it’s never [too] late to learn. [They’re] helping me with job placement, housing, and most importantly, my self-esteem, to know that I can still be a productive member of society, I thought I was done, I didn’t think I would be able to turn myself around, I didn’t think anybody cared. I’m excited about the future, I plan on taking full advantage of this program. So in closing thank you for this opportunity, it has changed my life for the better.

Liam [last name withheld]

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of October 3, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Gladys McLean

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


October 6, 2016

IT Business Edge: Tech Apprenticeship Program in Washington State to Expand Nationwide

The program specifically targets underrepresented groups — women, minorities and veterans. Carlson explained the approach to make that happen: What we did here [in Washington State], as a pilot, was we partnered in the marketplace with community organizations, community colleges, groups that focus their services around those three target populations. We did a soft rollout — we didn’t roll it out to the public and do a mass announcement until just a couple of weeks ago. We actually gave it exclusively to those community partners a month earlier, so that we were filling the pipeline upfront with the people that we absolutely knew are the ones we wanted to place into these occupations.

So whether that was Goodwill, Urban League, Tacoma Community House — all these local groups, and then several community colleges that had curricula that would match up well with what we were looking for — those are the groups that were filling the pipeline, along with several of the work force development councils in the area.

October 5, 2016

The Cap Times: Locked out: African-Americans and advocates see racial bias in the Dane County job market

Hurdles to employment like no access to transportation, lack of affordable child care, inadequate training and criminal history are far more likely to keep African-Americans from landing a decent job than whites. In addition, advocates and black job seekers say, blacks face both conscious and unconscious bias in the hiring process. And all those factors could help explain why a Labor Day report estimated that Wisconsin blacks are three times as likely as their white counterparts to be unemployed.

[…] Ed Lee, who oversees the Urban League’s jobs programs, said that once participants get their foot in the door, they potentially have the opportunity for a career. The Urban League also helps with issues like child care, transportation and criminal backgrounds. Currently located on the city’s south side, the organization, with backing from the city of Madison, plans to open a west-side location by 2018.

October 4, 2016

YES! Magazine: Where Black Unemployment Is Highest, Workers Strive to Close the Gap

The D.C. Black Workers Center, established two years ago [is a] place that helps to build economic empowerment for African Americans in the city. Located in the United Black Fund building, which houses Black nonprofits, the D.C. Center takes a unique approach to its job-training services by addressing the twofold crises of high unemployment among Black workers and the low wages they’re paid when they do find work. It is one of eight African American worker centers nationwide.

[…] They also teach members cooperative organizing. Last year, members received training in workplace democracies, in which they learned how to recruit other workers and create their own cooperatives. Lawyers explained the legal steps of developing a cooperative, and some members shared their observations from a visit to a child care cooperative in West Philadelphia. The visit has inspired some women at the D.C. Center to start a child care co-op.

October 2, 2016

The Journal Times: County Unveils Coffee Shop Giving Residents Job Training

The store will provide training and employment to help young adults develop job skills and experience, according to a news release. Many of the employees are in a workforce development program.

[…]“This is meant to be a short-term experience, not a permanent position, but it’s to build those critical customer service, critical soft skills, so they can transition to a private-sector employment opportunity,” said Mark Mundl, Workforce Solutions manager.

“Anyone that does not have a good work history or no work history, this is that first step to get them along that pathway to be able to be self-sufficient,” Mundl said.