Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of March 27, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


March 29, 2016

Grays Harbor Talk: YWCA of Olympia Brings Economic Empowerment Program to Grays Harbor County

The Economic Empowerment Program (EEP) is a free job-training program for young women between the ages of 16–24, which provides gender-responsive hands-on experiences at the YWCA Other Bank (hygiene product distribution center), individualized life and career support, mentoring and work placement prospects. Women who complete the program may be eligible for a financial stipend. In addition to hands-on job training, EEP offers a weekly well-being workshop for job trainees focused on strengthening the executive functioning and soft skills necessary for success and access to Kathleen’s Professional Clothing Closet.

[…] The program ensures that women are equipped with competence, confidence and connections to help them succeed in the workplace, move beyond minimum wage employment and experience financial and familial stability.

March 27, 2016

CT Post: Program works to keep low-income women from dropping out of college

Citing trends that show younger single mothers often working in low-wage jobs, if they are employed at all, the program’s founders decided to tackle a skills gap that is keeping more women and families in poverty. AT HCC, the program includes a workforce development component, coaching support, financial literacy development and access to community supports and more, in addition to scholarships and emergency financial aid.

March 26, 2016

The Commercial Appeal: Guest column: Let’s improve the odds for rural families

That complexity is why the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s FY2017 Budget invests in evidence-based and other promising practices to respond to the full range of challenges for families in rural America.

[…] We also want to help rural communities implement “two-generation” strategies to combating poverty, providing grants to communities to more efficiently align workforce development for parents with early childhood education and child care for their kids. It simply makes sense: a single mom is going to have a tougher time finishing community college if she has to worry about child care.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of March 21, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing. 


March 24, 2016

Affordable Housing Finance: Workforce Shortages and Creative Partnerships

HomeAid Northern Virginia is taking this one step further and addressing the workforce issue by convening our partners around job training and job placement. Partnering with select construction trade businesses to understand the type of workers they need and the skills they are looking for, we are matching these needs to the workforce training programs that our nonprofit service provider partners offer to their clients. The hope is to create a virtuous cycle: build capacity in the local skilled labor workforce and change the lives of vulnerable individuals by providing them job skills and a path to employment with our partner companies.

Today in our local area, formerly homeless individuals are now being placed in jobs in the homebuilding industry and are being provided the support they need in terms of housing, transportation, childcare, financial management, and more.

March 23, 2016

CRAIN’s Detroit Business: Report: Detroit workforce faces variety of obstacles

The Detroit Workforce Development Board, established last year to create jobs to revive the city of Detroit, faces many obstacles, according to a new report released Wednesday by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

While the city is abundant in work-readiness programs, secondary-education institutions mostly exist outside of the city, proving difficult for Detroiters who lack transportation options. Chase recommends greater coordination between the educators and training programs to improve services to low-skilled workers, such as food, housing or child care services and transportation assistance.

North Fort Myers Neighbor: Deadline for medical office program extended

The Lee County Department of Human Services’ award-winning Lee Education and Employment (L.E.E.) Medical Office Skills Program is once again on the horizon. Twice a year, the classes are offered to people who are interested in gaining a career in a higher-paying profession such as medical clerical positions to get themselves out of poverty.

[…] The L.E.E. Program is offered at no cost to eligible applicants. Students receive paid training/tuition, Intensive case management, books, assistance with the cost of child care during class hours and other supportive services.

March 21, 2016

Next City: Grand Rapids Company Unlocks the Potential of Former Inmates

Fortunately, McKinley was put in touch with Hope Network, a faith-based organization and Cascade partner that provides job training, early work experience and logistical support to help recent inmates and other disadvantaged workers transition into the workplace. Hope Network’s Workforce Development Program helped McKinley land an initial position clearing vacant lots to build up his resume, which then helped him land his first job at Cascade.

[…] Another major lesson from this work was the need to take environmental factors that could jeopardize attendance, such as issues with transportation, housing or child care, into account. Since the late 1990s, Cascade has co-employed (with DHS) a full-time case manager to help new employees troubleshoot these issues, which has dramatically reduced absenteeism and turnover.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

 

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of March 14, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing. 


March 16, 2016

The Buffalo News: Another Voice: Workforce development system must work for all (by Jeffrey M. Conrad is New York State director of the Center for Employment Opportunities)

A Partnership for the Public Good publication, “Working Toward Equity,” went further and pointed out that local unemployment rates are higher and earnings are lower for African-Americans and Hispanics even during this improved economic period. Additionally, many residents who are working poor or frequently unemployed face multiple barriers to employment, such as low educational levels, language barriers, criminal backgrounds, disabilities and limited means of transportation.

Given that Buffalo’s unemployment is down and our economy is much stronger today, this is the ideal time to focus our efforts on these populations that need additional services. If we want to have an inclusive economy, then we need to expand funding for programming that works to help connect people with employment barriers to the workforce.

March 16, 2016

Park Rapids Enterprise: Editorial: Job fair offers great opportunity to find work

Barriers do exist for those struggling to make ends meet, many depending on state and county services.

A good number of folks in the community deal with social issues that make it difficult to find and hold down a job. Lack of permanent housing, transportation difficulties, childcare challenges, chemical dependency, mental health issues, or just plain lack of motivation. At the same time there are also many who face these same issues and overcome the obstacles. It can be done.

Social services, mental health professionals and other providers in the community work to get people “off the system” and on the road to self-reliance.

March 14, 2016

Industry Week: Modern Day Rosies: Portraits of Women in Manufacturing

The Jobs to Move America coalition teamed up with California Institute of Technology for Women’s History Month, organizing the Women Can Build photography exhibit. The exhibit, featuring photographs by Pulitzer Prize winner Deanna Fitzmaurice, reveals the overlooked contributions of skilled and hard-working women who are building our trams, rail and buses. Jobs to Move hosted several Caltech faculty to comment on how women around the world are achieving and fighting for equal rights, equal pay, equal access, and equal opportunity in the workplace.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of February 29, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing. 


March 2, 2016

New Hampshire Union Leader: Hassan’s work program could cost up to $100m over 5 years

“Through Gateway to Work, we will strengthen job training, create new apprenticeship opportunities, help remove the barriers that cause too many of our citizens to fail in the workplace and help our young people get a leg up on their futures,” Hassan said while promoting the proposal Wednesday at Manchester Community College.

The plan would provide funds for workers to pay for child care and transportation as well as pay the employee’s salary for six weeks. It also would provide for expanded in-home visitation to work with more at-risk parents and help them enter and stay in the workforce, Hassan said.

“What we saw from our experiences is so many folks that we had hired that we thought would be good workers were failing because of personal barriers, not because of aptitude,” Sullivan said. Many workers faced issues over getting to work or caring for children, he said.

February 26, 2016

York Daily Record: “Pathway of Hope” to help impoverished families

A nationwide effort to help families become self-sufficient and overcome the cycle of poverty is now being offered at The Salvation Army of York.

It’s called the “Pathway of Hope,” and it’s intended to help families overcome barriers that keep them in crisis, said Mindy McCormick, regional coordinator. It could be the lack of job training or difficulty finding affordable child care to work in the evening, for example.

Case workers will work with the families to develop steps to reach their goals, she said. Families will spend 6 months to two years in the program.

February 26, 2016

Banner-Press: Grant boosts youth initiative

According to Nation, the greatest barrier for unconnected youth in Southeast Nebraska is the lack of living wage jobs. Other closely related barriers include the lack of affordable, high-quality child care, housing, public transportation and health care.

BVCA will provide youth assessments, Central Access Navigation, case management, mentoring, financial literacy training, help saving for a vehicle to alleviate transportation needs, RentWise classes, referrals into Head Start for child care, housing assistance and educational/job training referrals. BVCA will also oversee the creation of youth councils to provide input into the services and processes.

February 21, 2016

The Gazette: Good pay may be way to attract more women into construction field

Work in the construction industry often is seen as tough, grueling and dirty. But once the dust has settled, it can offer opportunities and good pay.

But the construction industry still is trying to rebuild its workforce after the recession and as baby boomers retire. Some say now is a good time for more women to pick up the tool belt.

“There’s a great opportunity for women in the industry, it is a great time for them to get in,” said Chad Kleppe, president of Master Builders of Iowa, a construction association. “Construction is in drastic need for workers and it is a perfect time to consider. Employers are willing to train and work with candidates to work them into what they need. It is very advantageous.”

February 13, 2016

Trib Live: Women struggle to escape unemployment, study finds

Unemployed women older than 50 have had a particularly difficult time getting back into the workforce since the recession ended in 2009, despite an improving labor market and unemployment rate of 4.9 percent.

The impact on older women can be especially harsh because they are less likely to have pension balances that would support them, experts say. Unemployment benefits generally provide half a person’s weekly wages and run out after 26 weeks.

More likely are the family considerations that attend decisions to work.

“I think that could be a big factor,” Monge-Naranjo said. “Firms like to hire people that they are a little more certain about the prospects … and traditionally, it has been the case that women are the ones taking time off.”


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

 

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of February 1, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing. 


February 1, 2016

WCPO Cincinnati: What’s old is new again: Apprenticeships for manufacturing jobs help fill big workforce gap

Bullock, 37, pivoted to a career path that offers much better pay than waiting tables and one that’s hungry for skilled workers: machine tool operating. The industry is thriving in Greater Cincinnati to the point that prospective workers can be trained in a year or less without the need for an associate’s or bachelor’s degree for entry-level jobs that can pay $20 an hour or more.

January 30, 2016

Providence Journal: John Kostrzewa: R.I.’s cities need most help closing job-skills gap

“Working women of color have a different experience with the labor market than women as a whole,” she said. “Policymakers should address workforce development programs that target these populations.”

Jordan-Zachery’s report said that job-training programs that have reached women of color in cities tend to focus on low-skill jobs that don’t pay enough to support a family.

She also said the programs do not recognize the geographical “spatial mismatch,” explaining that while the women live in the central cities, the jobs they are being trained for are in the suburbs and they often have few transportation options to get there.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of January 26, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing. 


 

January 27, 2016

PBS NewsHour: The only girl in school to spark an interest in welding

“The bigger picture is, why aren’t there more women going into welding or why aren’t there more women going into manufacturing,” said Rude. “From day one, women are fed the story of pink and princess,” she added. “It’s definitely a false representation of individuality.”

Watch more stories of students challenging gender stereotypes, part of our series called Outside the Box.

January 27, 2016

Lowell Sun (MA): Task force tackling underemployment

At a meeting of the governor’s Task Force on Persons Facing Chronically Higher Rates of Unemployment on Monday, Baker announced that his administration would invest $5 million of his fiscal 2017 budget into targeting chronically high unemployment. The breakdown of those funds will include $2 million to create an Economic Opportunity Fund, for investing in community-based organizations who partner with businesses to offer job training and hiring opportunities for people who face employment barriers…

Gregg Croteau, UTEC’s executive director, who was appointed to the task force when it was formed last March, told The Sun on Tuesday that his organization is “really optimistic” that Baker’s budget will include funding for helping people re-entering society after incarceration. “This Economic Opportunity Fund is really well-crafted in the sense that it also recognizes there’s a need for the supportive services as well,” Croteau said, including child care, transportation and help with substance-abuse issues.

January 26, 2016

Education Week (blog): Workforce Training Programs Should Consider Equity, Acting Ed. Secretary Says

States, communities, school districts, non-profits, and the federal government need to make sure equity is the watchword for implementation of the Workforce Investment and Opportunity Act. That was the message John B. King Jr., the acting U.S. Secretary of Education, delivered Tuesday to the Workforce Opportunity and Investment Act national convening, a conference of 700 state leaders and other organizations working to implement the new law.

King is hoping that job training facilities, community colleges, and adult-education providers will think about the needs of English-language learners, minority students, low-income students, students with disabilities parents, and other “nontraditional” students as they implement WIOA, which generally governors job training programs.

He urged job training programs, post-secondary institutions, and other adult education providers to think about potential barriers students might face in completing their training or degree, such as lack of access to child care or transportation.

January 22, 2016

EvoLLLution (an online newspaper on higher education): Community Colleges and the New Workforce Development Ecosystem

By Darlene Miller, Executive Director, National Council for Workforce Education

Finally, to address the personal barriers and challenges faced by so many students, community colleges must improve their partnerships with local community-based organizations. Nonprofits are well-equipped to provide case management and strong support systems to help students overcome barriers and challenges. Through high-quality education programming, providing a range of academic and non-academic support services, and employer engagement strategies to ensure the partnership meets the demands of local industries, these types of partnerships are able to leverage institutional capacities and resources to ensure student success

January 21, 2016

Duluth News Tribune: Program aims to help people land better-paying jobs

The program has been dubbed Connect Forward, and it will build on five years of work at a Financial Opportunity Center operated by Community Action Duluth and funded primarily by $885,000 already funneled through LISC, to date.

Miller pledged that her organization will assist 150 people through the program in the coming year. She said Community Action provides accessible evening classes twice a week, with coaching, child care and food available on site.

Marissa Jackson came to Community Action Duluth in March 2014 as a young single parent living in her parents’ home. She said staff members helped her create a budget and locate affordable housing, but employment difficulties have been difficult to overcome.

“Finding a job for a single mom is hard, especially when you don’t have child care support,” she said. “Jobs in my field, which is working as a personal care assistant, can be challenging because they often involve working nights and weekends.”

January 21, 2016

Industry Week: Leadership Lab Gives Women in Manufacturing a Boost

The national trade group Women in Manufacturing, along with Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, today announced the creation of a Leadership Lab for Women in Manufacturing. The training program will provide executive education and training to its members in mid- to high-level management roles in manufacturing careers.

January 20, 2016

Costal Courier: Georgia missing a chance to strengthen its workforce

By Melissa Johnson, a policy analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute

While most adults who rely on cash and food assistance in Georgia lack any education beyond high school, not enough of the state’s workers are trained for so-called middle-skill jobs. Middle-skill jobs require more than a high school diploma but less than a four-year degree.

A new Georgia Budget and Policy Institute report shows how the state could better leverage the potential of safety net programs Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) to build a more skilled workforce. Using these initiatives to educate Georgians with low incomes would have long-term benefits for the state.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of January 11, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Rachel Linn

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing. 


January 15, 2016

Industry Week: Lifting Families Out of Poverty and Into Advanced Manufacturing Careers (By Dr. Anne M. Kress, President, Monroe Community College, Rochester, N.Y.)

ACCESS: Whether it’s owning a car or paying bus fares, transportation is a significant cost to families that are already struggling to make ends meet. Similarly, the cost of child care may prevent a single parent from pursuing a college education. And individuals who are holding down jobs while going to college might not have enough time to get from work to class.

To remove these barriers, MCC offers training programs in city neighborhoods. We have partnered with community groups such as the Ibero-American Action League, a dual-language human services agency that serves Hispanic residents, to offer educational opportunities right in the communities that would benefit from them most.

To help with child care, we partner with community providers to provide services and have secured state grants to offset costs for students.

January 9, 2016

The Auburn Citizen (Auburn, NY): Palmer: How Employment Pathways helps Cayuga County-area people in poverty find jobs

Employment Pathways is a new program administered by Cayuga/Seneca Community Action Agency and located at Cayuga Community College Cayuga Works Career Center.

The agency has partnered with the Cayuga County Department of Social Services, Cayuga Works Career Center, Cayuga Community College, Cayuga-Onondaga BOCES and several local employers, including TRW Automotive, to address barriers to obtaining and/or retaining employment within our community. Some of the barriers include education, training and/or soft skills deficits, unreliable or no transportation, child care and housing issues, and the shortage of living wage jobs. This collaborative effort engages public, private and nonprofit sectors to connect people in poverty with the community resources necessary to travel the pathway to economic stability.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org