What We’re Reading Today (10/2)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


IWPR IN THE NEWS

Bloomberg BNA

Gender Gap Persists in Parental Leave

Martin Berman-Gorvine, September 29

 

KXAN

Council unanimously votes to explore paid sick leave

Kate Weidaw and Jacqulyn Powell, September 30

 

DOMESTIC POLICY

Huffington Post

Starbucks Under Fire For Giving Less Parental Leave To Hourly Workers

Emily Peck, October 2

 

The Wall Street Journal

The Link Between Economic Growth and Tax Cuts Is Tenuous

Kate Davidson, October 1

 

The New York Times

Marches for Racial Justice and Black Women Converge in Washington

Emily Baumgaertner, September 30

 

The Washington Post

How the military handles sexual assault cases behind closed doors

Craig Whitlock, September 30

 

CULTURE

The New York Times

‘Faux’ Male Feminists Draw Ire in Hollywood

Monica Corcoran Harel, September 30

 

OPINION

The New York Times

Let Wronged Workers Join Together for Justice

David Freeman Engstrom, October 2

What We’re Reading Today (9/29)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


 

IWPR IN THE NEWS

Big Country

Austin workers could get guaranteed sick leave

Erica Garner, September 29

 

Bloomberg BNA

Valuing, Supporting Women Leads to Engagement

Martin Berman-Gorvine, September 28

 

CNBC

Tech pays some of the highest salaries in the US—there’s just one problem

Shawn M. Carter, September 28

 

DOMESTIC POLICY

The New York Times

Supreme Court Will Hear Case on Mandatory Fees to Unions

Adam Liptak, September 28

 

The Washington Post

White families have nearly 10 times the net worth of black families. And the gap is growing.

Tracy Jan, September 28

 

The Washington Post

The number of people defaulting on federal student loans is climbing

Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, September 28

 

The New York Times

Feel That Post-Recession Bounce? The Rich Feel It the Most

Ben Casselman, September 27

 

The Wall Street Journal

U.S. Families’ Wealth, Incomes Rose, Fed Survey Says

Harriet Torry, September 27

 

The New York Times

Students Look to Vending Machines for Better Access to Morning-After Pill

Christina Caron, September 28

 

LOCAL

The Washington Post

Fairfax pushes back against proposed English requirement for child care workers

Michael Alison Chandler, September 28

 

OPINION

Glamour

I’m a Woman Who’s Gone Inside the Male-Dominated Oil Industry—Here’s What I’ve Seen

Blaire Briody, September 28

 

The New York Times

What black Americans are most worried about in the Trump era

Eugene Scott, September 29

Paid Sick and Safe Days

Paid Sick and Safe Days

Survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking often need time off from work to seek medical care, obtain a protection order, and find shelter or safe housing to protect themselves and their children from harm. Once safe from immediate threats, survivors may need additional time off to work with victim advocates or participate in the justice system. Analysis of data from the National Violence Against Women Survey found that victims of intimate partner violence who were stalked lost an average of 10.1 days of paid work per year, those who were raped lost an average of 8.1 days per year, and those who experienced physical violence lost 7.2 days per year. Taking time off is often necessary to achieve safety, yet it can have a significant impact on survivors’ economic security. Paid sick and safe laws allow survivors to seek critical services when needed without having to jeopardize their ability to pay bills or their employment.

San Francisco was the first city to adopt a policy in 2007. Since then eight states and more than 30 counties and cities have enacted paid sick and safe leave policies. While individual statutes vary, these paid leave laws generally allow eligible employees to accrue time off that can be used to recover from an illness or take care of a sick family member without the loss of income or risk of losing their job. Many statutes include safe leave provisions for domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking victims to take paid time off to help ensure their safety and well-being. Approved activities may include seeking medical attention for injuries or counseling, obtaining victim and/or legal services, relocating oneself and one’s family, and participating in investigations or court proceedings related to abuse.

Protections for survivors vary by state with some including paid leave for domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking (Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington) while others only cover domestic and sexual violence (Connecticut) or domestic violence (Massachusetts). Of counties and cities with paid sick and safe leave ordinances, San Diego, San Francisco, Emeryville, and Los Angeles, CA; Chicago/Cook County, IL; Montgomery County, MD; Philadelphia, PA; New Brunswick, NJ; Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN; and Seattle and Spokane, WA, have coverage for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. While Berkeley and Oakland, CA; New Jersey City, Newark, Irvington, Passaic, East Orange, Paterson, Trenton, Montclair, Bloomfield, Elizabeth, Plainfield, and Morristown, NJ; and New York City, have paid sick leave policies they do not include safe time coverage for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

Coverage also often depends on the size of the employer and occupation, and accrual of paid sick hours often begins at the start of employment. When eligible, employers generally require a certain period of employment prior to accessing paid leave. For survivors protected by these laws, paid leave may mean the difference between risking their income and employement to be safe and maintaining economic independence so that they may be free from abuse in future.

For more information on these statutes and sick and safe leave campaigns, visit A Better Balance, Family Values@Work, or the National Partnership for Women and Families.

What We’re Reading Today (9/27)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


IWPR IN THE NEWS

KOB 4

Entrepreneur fights pay gap for Native American women

Colton Shone, September 26

 

Houston Chronicle

Texas A&M student’s baby makes waves as number of single student mothers grows

Lindsay Ellis, September 26

 

Chicago Tribune

How gay dads manage without paid paternity leave

Allison Bowen, September 26

 

Rolling Out

5 reasons players are taking a knee

Rashad Milligan, September 26

 

DOMESTIC POLICY

The Wall Street Journal

Fed’s Brainard Warns Economic Inequality Could Hurt U.S. Growth

Harriet Torry, September 26

 

USA Today

Attention, working moms: These are the 100 best companies to work for

David Carrig, September 26

 

The Wall Street Journal

Colleges Rethink Remedial Education to Get Students on Course to Graduation

Douglas Belkin, September 27

 

The Wall Street Journal

Declining Male Workforce Participation Reflects Supply, Not Demand, Says New Paper

Nick Timiraos, September 26

 

The Wall Street Journal

The Benefits of Early Childhood Education and Health Programs May Last Longer Than a Lifetime

Ben Leubsdorf, September 25

 

The New York Times

How Did Marriage Become a Mark of Privilege?

Claire Cain Miller, September 25

 

The New York Times

Target Raises Base Pay to $11 an Hour Heading Into Holidays

Tiffany Hsu, September 25

 

INTERNATIONAL

The Wall Street Journal

Saudi Arabia Lifts Ban on Women Driving

Margherita Stancati and Summer Said, September 26

 

OPINION

The Huffington Post

Time for California to Step up on Paid Family Leave

Jim Steyer, September 26

 

The New York Times

The Thickest Glass Ceiling in the Marine Corps Breaks

Teresa Fazio, September 25

What We’re Reading Today (9/22)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


IWPR IN THE NEWS

The Spectrum

What you need to know about Utah’s women and how much they’re getting paid

Emily Havens, September 21

 

Press Herald

Letter to the editor: Restaurant worker dishes on need for universal paid sick time

Heather Foran, September 21

 

DOMESTIC POLICY

Bloomberg

Rise of the Tech Bros Means Gender Pay Gap May Only Widen

Jacqueline Thorpe, September 22

 

The Washington Post

For the first time, the Marine Corps plans to have a female infantry officer among its ranks

Dan Lamothe, September 21

 

The Washington Post

States move to restrict domestic abusers from carrying guns

Katie Zezima, September 21

 

The Wall Street Journal

Baby Boomers’ New Job: Unpaid Care for the Elderly

Sarah Chaney, September 20

 

Seventeen

A New Study Shows Just How Many 14-Year-Old Girls Are Depressed And It’s Intense

Katie Jones, September 21

 

Chalkbeat

New York City teachers don’t get paid maternity leave. Their paychecks prove it.

Christina Veiga, September 21

 

The Wall Street Journal

Fed Says Total U.S. Household Net Worth Rose in Second Quarter

Eric Morath, September 21

 

The Wall Street Journal

U.S. Jobless Claims Fell Despite Recent Hurricanes

Sharon Nunn and Eric Morath, September 21

 

The New York Times

A Start-Up Slump Is a Drag on the Economy. Big Business May Be to Blame.

Ben Casselman, September 20

 

LOCAL

 

The Washington Post

‘I need this’: At a job fair with Eric Holder and Howard Schultz, hundreds of young people get on-the-spot offers

Perry Stein, September 22

 

The Washington Post

Funding for home visiting set to expire, leaving early intervention services in limbo for many

Michael Alison Chandler, September 22

 

OPINION

The Washington Post

We don’t think Michelle Jones could change because we see black moms as monsters

Manisha Sinha, September 21

 

Teen Vogue

How Black Women Have Impacted Feminism Over Time

Taylor Crumpton, September 21

 

The New York Times

California’s Sexual Assault Law Will Hurt Black Kids

Lara Bazelon, September 22

 

The New York Times

Even College Doesn’t Bridge the Racial Income Gap

NYT Editorial Board, September 20

What We’re Reading Today (9/20)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


IWPR IN THE NEWS

Market Watch

More than 1 in 10 college students is a single mom

Jillian Berman, September 20

 

DOMESTIC POLICY

The New York Times

Unemployment Is So 2009: Labor Shortage Gives Workers an Edge

Eduardo Porter, September 19

 

The New York Times

Democrats Mount Effort to Recruit Women as State Attorneys General

Jonathan Martin, September 19

 

Glamour

Women and Opioids: Inside the Deadliest Drug Epidemic in American History

Liz Brody, September 19

 

Market Watch

Rigid gender stereotypes tied to increased depression, violence and suicide in children

Kari Paul, September 20

 

Market Watch

All the single ladies: When it comes to financial planning, women should anticipate spending more time on their own

Alicia H. Munnell, September 20

 

The Wall Street Journal

College Debt Far From a Uniform Burden

Melissa Korn, September 20

 

The New York Times

Woman Says Fox News Banned Her After She Accused Charles Payne of Rape

Emily Steel, September 18

 

LOCAL

The Washington Post

Even in a prosperous city like D.C., many still go hungry, report finds

Courtland Miloy, September 19

 

OPINION

The Washington Post

No one listens to women when they speak around here

Dana Milbank, September 19

 

The Washington Post

Induction of union-busting Reagan into Labor’s Hall of Honor shocks union

Joe Davidson, September 19

What We’re Reading Today (9/18)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


IWPR IN THE NEWS

CNBC

How Oprah Winfrey, Venus Williams and other celebrities are addressing the pay gap

Courtney Connley, September 15

 

Mic

The gender wage gap is closing — but not for the reason you think

Stacey Leasca, September 15

 

DOMESTIC POLICY

Market Watch

Women’s wages are catching up with those of men in these states…

Alessandra Malito, September 18

 

The New York Times

When Affirmative Action Isn’t Enough

Dana Goldstein, September 17

 

Huffington Post

This Cop Had The Audacity To Have A Baby. So Her Bosses Got Rid Of Her.

Emily Peck, September 16

 

USA Today

With workers scarce, hiring criteria loosen

Paul Davidson, September 18

 

The Wall Street Journal

Sorry, You Are Probably Not Getting a Raise Next Year

John Simons, September 18

 

The New York Times

Bump in U.S. Incomes Doesn’t Erase 50 Years of Pain

Patricia Cohen, September 16

 

The New York Times

Lurid Lawsuit’s Quiet End Leaves Silicon Valley Start-Up Barely Dented

David Streitfeld, September 15

 

INTERNATIONAL

The New York Times

The World’s Most Powerful Woman Won’t Call Herself a Feminist

Susan Chira, September 16

 

LOCAL

The Washington Post

D.C. has been failing to deliver for black mothers for a long time

Aza Nedhari, September 15

 

OPINION

The Washington Post

The importance of historical perspective in understanding recent good economic news

Jared Bernstein, September 18

 

The Washington Post

The middle class rocks — again

Robert J. Samuelson, September 17

 

The Washington Post

We still have time to repent for American racism

Danya Ruttenberg, September 18

 

The Washington Post

Researchers have a lot of freedom about which findings to emphasize. That can be a problem.

L.J. Zigerell, September 18

 

The New York Times

Who Gets to Define Campus Rape?

Miriam Gleckman-Krut and Nicole Bedera, September 18

 

The Washington Post

Colleges must not turn back the clock on efforts to combat sexual assault

Michael S. Roth, September 18

 

The New York Times

Feminism and the Future of Philosophy

Gary Gutting, September 16

 

The New York Times

In This Sports Gender Gap, Men Fall Short

Will Leitch, September 15