What We’re Reading Today (12/8)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


DOMESTIC POLICY

The Wall Street Journal

Mine the Gap: More Women Embrace Mining Careers

Rachel Pannett, December 8

 

The New York Times

Job Growth Signals Robust Economy, With Gain of 228,000

Ben Casselman, December 8

 

The Washington Post

Exactly how male-dominated are central banks? Here are the numbers.

Cristina Bodea and Tara Iseneker, December 8

 

The Washington Post

The U.S. economy is creating millionaires at an astonishing pace. But what’s it doing for everyone else?

Christopher Ingraham, December 7

 

Moneyish

All-male panels are going extinct and this is a big reason why

Katerina Ang, December 8

 

The Washington Post

Bill would let silenced victims of workplace harassment take their claims to court

Drew Harwell, December 6

 

OPINION

The Washington Post

This woman was a silence breaker on harassment. And she was fired for it, she says.

Petula Dvorak, December 7

 

The New York Times

How Harvard’s Hypocrisy Could Hurt Your Union

Vail Kohnert-Yount and Jared Odessky, December 7

 

The Washington Post

A Welcome College Diversity Push

David Leonhardt, December 7

IWPR Research News Roundup – October 2017

RESEARCH MAKING THE NEWS

What It’s Like To Fight For Equal Pay When You’re A Latina Construction Worker

By Judith Ohikuare |  | 11.3.2017

These contrasts might seem like trite figures, until one considers, based on a projection from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, that Hispanic women may not achieve equal pay with white men until the year 2233. But this is about so much more than statistics — we wanted to hear first-person accounts of Latina women who are fighting against salary discrimination.

Citing: Women’s Median Earnings as a Percent of Men’s, 1985-2016 (Full-time, Year-Round Workers) with Projections for Pay Equity, by Race/Ethnicity, by The Institute for Women’s Policy Research, November 2017

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Most Americans are Unprepared for the Skyrocketing Cost of Long-Term Care

By Emily Gurnon |  | 10.19.2017

The cost of long-term care just keeps going up and most Americans keep believing — incorrectly — that the government will cover most or all of it. “Our population is aging, living longer, and not prepared,” said David O’Leary, president and CEO of Genworth’s U.S. Life division. […] A private room in a nursing home now costs consumers more than $8,000 a month, or $97,455 a year, according to the report, which provides national median figures.

Citing: Genworth 2017 Cost of Care Survey, by Genworth Financial , October 2017

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New Research Shows Women Freelancers Face a Big Gender Pay Gap

By Nina Zipkin |  | 10.19.2017

The gender wage gap in the United States is a persistent, pervasive issue. While the gap has narrowed over time, Pew Research found in 2015, women were paid 83 percent of what men earn. […] But the pay gap isn’t only a problem in corporate America. For those who make their living as a freelancer, the issue still remains, despite not having to contend with the structures and hierarchies of a traditional office, according to a new study from client management platform Honeybook. The company’s analysis of 200,000 invoices found that women make 32 percent less than men for the same job in the creative economy. Women earn roughly $30,700 a year, while men earn more than $45,400.

Citing: 2017 Gender Pay GapHoneybook | Rising Tide , October 2017

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The Healthy D.C. Economy is Leaving Longtime Black Residents Behind, New Study Finds

By Perry Stein |  | 10.12.2017

The booming and increasingly dynamic D.C. economy is leaving the city’s longtime black residents behind, according to a study released Thursday that examines African American employment, population and housing trends in the nation’s capital. The Georgetown University report, which culled data from several recent studies, found that more than half of all new jobs in the District between 2010 and 2020 will require at least a bachelor’s degree, although only 12.3 percent of black residents in 2014 had graduated from college. It noted the average white household in the region has a net worth of $284,000, while the assets of the average black household are just $3,500.

Citing: An Analysis: African American Employment, Population, & Housing Trends in Washington, D.C. by Maurice Jackson, Ph.D, Georgetown University, October 2017

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Some advice for business on the gender pay gap: World Bank research has found compelling case for offering childcare services to staff

By Sarah Gordon |  | 10.4.2017

[…]Advice on what to do [to close the gender pay gap], though, is hardly lacking. Employers can do little to change societal norms which mean that, even in places like Scandinavia where great progress has been made getting more women into top jobs, they still do the bulk of unpaid work in the home. But there are many effective measures companies can take, and a constant flow of research to help them select what works best. The IFC, for example, a member of the World Bank Group, has just looked at 34 companies around the world that offer childcare services to staff, and found that there is a compelling business case for doing so.

Citing: Tackling Childcare: The Business Case for Employer-Supported Childcare by the International Finance Corporation, October 2017

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When Will the Economy Start Caring About Home-Care Work?

By Annie Lowrey |  | 9.22.2017

Home-health and personal-care work is one of the country’s fastest-growing occupational sectors. But it is one marked by low pay and meager benefits, a problem that might become more urgent as the U.S.’s population continues to age. On top of that, care workers face high rates of wage theft, tax and benefits misclassification, and employer fraud, according to a new report from the National Employment Law Project (NELP), a think tank and advocacy organization.

Citing: Surveying the Home Care Workforce: Their Challenges and the Positive Impact of Unionization, by the National Employment Law Project, September 2017

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NEW RESEARCH REPORTS

Women in the Workplace 2017

By Rachel Thomas et al. | Lean In | October 2017

Women remain underrepresented at every level in corporate America, despite earning more college degrees than men for thirty years and counting. There is a pressing need to do more, and most organizations realize this: company commitment to gender diversity is at an all-time high for the third year in a row. Despite this commitment, progress continues to be too slow—and may even be stalling. One of the most powerful reasons for this is a simple one: we have blind spots when it comes to diversity, and we can’t solve problems that we don’t see or understand clearly.

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One Quarter of Hispanic Children in the United States Have an Unauthorized Immigrant Parent

By Wyatt Clarke, Kimberly Turner, Lina Guzman | National Research Center on Hispanic Families and Children | October 2017

Approximately 1 in 4 U.S. Latino children have a parent who is an unauthorized immigrant, a finding that is striking in its consistency across data sources and methods. This means that there are more than 4 million Latino children in the United States who are at risk of experiencing parental separation and the stress and fear associated with their family’s uncertain legal status. We also found that the likelihood of a Latino child having an unauthorized immigrant parent varies by country of heritage, suggesting varying levels of risk to children’s well-being.

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Meta-Analysis of Field Experiment Shows No Change in Racial Discrimination in Hiring Over Time

By Lincoln Quilliam, Devah Pager, Ole Hexel, Arnfinn H. Midtoen | Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences | October 2017

With the election of the country’s first African-American president in 2008, many concluded that the country had finally moved beyond its troubled racial past. Despite clear signs of racial progress, however, on several key dimensions racial inequality persists and has even increased. For example, racial gaps in unemployment have shown little change since 1980, and the black–white gap in labor force participation rates among young men widened during this time. […] Indeed, while expressions of explicit prejudice have declined precipitously over time, measures of stereotypes and implicit bias appear to have changed little over the past few decades. In this view, far from disappearing, racial bias has taken on new forms, becoming more contingent, subtle, and covert.

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The Impact of Low Unemployment Rates on Disadvantaged Groups

By Cherrie Bucknor and Dean Baker | Center for Economic and Policy Research | October 2017

The 4.2 percent unemployment rate reported for September 2017 is the lowest level since 2001. It is important to recognize that this figure is well below the unemployment rate that many economists— including those at the Federal Reserve Board and the Congressional Budget Office— consider to be  consistent with a stable inflation rate. […] While there have been gains throughout the economy due to the Federal Reserve Board’s decision to allow the unemployment rate to continue to fall (as opposed to raising interest rates sharply to slow the pace of job creation), blacks and Hispanics have benefited disproportionately from the drop in unemployment.

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The 2017 Distressed Communities Index

By Kenan Fikri and John Lettieri | Economic Innovation Group | September 2017

It is fair to wonder whether a recovery that excludes tens of millions of Americans and thousands of communities deserves to be called a recovery at all. Indeed, the consequences extend far beyond the individual communities being left behind. The further we go down the path of geographically exclusive growth, the more we limit our nation’s economic potential as a whole—and the more fractured our society risks becoming in the process. Even residents of prosperous locales have an interest in ensuring a more inclusive map of well-being. The challenge of “reconnecting” distressed communities is urgent and  complex—especially so for policymakers.

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Post-hurricane recovery efforts must include women’s voices

By Heidi Hartmann and Geanine Wester

The people in cities and towns across Florida and the Caribbean (as well as those in Houston and the coastal areas) find themselves in the unenviable position that the people of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast found themselves in just 12 years ago: wondering how to rebuild and recover in the wake of a disastrous storm. Many are looking back to the recovery in post-Katrina New Orleans to learn lessons for what to do this time, which is encouraging, and the rescue effort has already benefitted from lessons learned from Katrina.

The distance of 12 years has produced a body of research on the post-Katrina Gulf Coast that can be instructive for those with the unfortunate task of rebuilding whole communities. One lesson that we hope will be heeded in post-Irma and post-Harvey recoveries: include women — particularly women whose voices might not be easily heard, such as poor women and women of color — in recovery planning.

Women are more vulnerable to climate disasters than men for a number of reasons. Evacuating or rebuilding often comes at a cost, yet in every state in the country, women are more likely to live in poverty than men. This is particularly true in Florida, where a recent report by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) in collaboration with the Florida Women’s Funding Alliance found that the state ranked in the bottom third of all states for the share of women living in poverty. The outlook is not promising: women in Florida are more likely to live in poverty than they did in 2004.

What’s worse is that women of color in Florida, as is true in other states, have much higher poverty rates than white women. The poverty rates among Florida’s black women (25.2 percent), Native American (21.4 percent), and Hispanic women (21.2 percent) are about twice as high as for white women (11.9 percent) in the state.

Women, particularly low-income women and women of color, have the greatest stake in effective and humane disaster recovery.

Paid Sick and Safe Days

Paid Sick and Safe Days

Survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking often need time off from work to seek medical care, obtain a protection order, and find shelter or safe housing to protect themselves and their children from harm. Once safe from immediate threats, survivors may need additional time off to work with victim advocates or participate in the justice system. Analysis of data from the National Violence Against Women Survey found that victims of intimate partner violence who were stalked lost an average of 10.1 days of paid work per year, those who were raped lost an average of 8.1 days per year, and those who experienced physical violence lost 7.2 days per year. Taking time off is often necessary to achieve safety, yet it can have a significant impact on survivors’ economic security. Paid sick and safe laws allow survivors to seek critical services when needed without having to jeopardize their ability to pay bills or their employment.

San Francisco was the first city to adopt a policy in 2007. Since then eight states and more than 30 counties and cities have enacted paid sick and safe leave policies. While individual statutes vary, these paid leave laws generally allow eligible employees to accrue time off that can be used to recover from an illness or take care of a sick family member without the loss of income or risk of losing their job. Many statutes include safe leave provisions for domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking victims to take paid time off to help ensure their safety and well-being. Approved activities may include seeking medical attention for injuries or counseling, obtaining victim and/or legal services, relocating oneself and one’s family, and participating in investigations or court proceedings related to abuse.

Protections for survivors vary by state with some including paid leave for domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking (Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington) while others only cover domestic and sexual violence (Connecticut) or domestic violence (Massachusetts). Of counties and cities with paid sick and safe leave ordinances, San Diego, San Francisco, Emeryville, and Los Angeles, CA; Chicago/Cook County, IL; Montgomery County, MD; Philadelphia, PA; New Brunswick, NJ; Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN; and Seattle and Spokane, WA, have coverage for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. While Berkeley and Oakland, CA; New Jersey City, Newark, Irvington, Passaic, East Orange, Paterson, Trenton, Montclair, Bloomfield, Elizabeth, Plainfield, and Morristown, NJ; and New York City, have paid sick leave policies they do not include safe time coverage for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

Coverage also often depends on the size of the employer and occupation, and accrual of paid sick hours often begins at the start of employment. When eligible, employers generally require a certain period of employment prior to accessing paid leave. For survivors protected by these laws, paid leave may mean the difference between risking their income and employement to be safe and maintaining economic independence so that they may be free from abuse in future.

For more information on these statutes and sick and safe leave campaigns, visit A Better Balance, Family Values@Work, or the National Partnership for Women and Families.

Intern Spotlight: Jiani Yang

image_uploaded_from_ios_1024.jpgName: Jiani Yang

Major/Year/School: MA in Higher Education Administration, Graduate School of Education and Human Development, George Washington University.

Position: Research Intern, Student Parent for Success Initiative

Past Internship: Summer Intern at The Columbian College of Arts and Science Undergraduate Academic Advising Office

What drew you to an internship at IWPR?

Last spring, my history of higher education class had a series of discussions about the history of women in higher education. It was such an eye-opening journey. After speaking with some experts in the field and recognizing many issues still affecting girls and women around the world, I decided to learn more about how to empower girls and women through education. IWPR positively influences women’s status through conducting research based on strong data and analysis, which resonates with my personal and career goals.

What research areas do you focus on?

Currently my research focuses on IWPR’s Student Parent Success Initiative. This program addresses the needs of low-income student parents, especially single mothers, in accessing and completing higher education degrees through research on topics like access to child care.

What has been the best part of interning at IWPR so far?

I really enjoyed the opportunity to meet so many fun, driven, and brilliant people at IWPR. Everyone I talk with is helping me to grow both as an intern and a person. Most common tasks for research intern are fact-checking IWPR publications and collecting information. Honestly, I didn’t expect to like them. But these two activities have allowed me to learn new knowledge and develop a more mature and sophisticated research approach.

Any advice for future IWPR interns?

I have two pieces of advice for future IWPR interns. First, believe in yourself. No matter how well you think you’ve prepared for this internship, there are going to be some curve balls your work throws at you. However, it is crucial to remember you’re here to learn and you will be successful. Second, don’t be afraid to ask “stupid” questions. It is absolutely easier said than done. I had tremendous support from my fellow interns when I first came to IWPR. If you feel overwhelmed by new work, don’t feel embarrassed to ask for help.

What are your future career interests?

For the foreseeable future, I will start my Ed.M. in Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University in fall 2018. I expect to incorporate new knowledge into my research on women and girls’ education.

Favorite lunch spot? My favorite lunch spot is OKI Bowl DC & Sake. I love their chashu and beef rice bowls.

Favorite D.C. museum? I can’t pick a favorite, since I haven’t visited many museums in Washington, D.C. But art museums are my favorite type of museum. I had a great time during my most recent trip to the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. I’m no art expert, but I find the aesthetics of traditional and modern art appealing and soothing.

Favorite podcast or reading material on your commute? I am fairly new to podcasts, but so far favorite one is Planet Money. Planet Money is educational, informative, and entertaining. I chose Planet Money in an attempt to learn some economics knowledge, but its light, comedic, and thought-provoking storytelling made me stay.

What else do you like to do in your spare time? I love to have brunch with friends and chat for hours. Also, I enjoy a good cup of coffee, and a quiet place to read.


Learn more about IWPR’s internship program here.

Intern Spotlight: Abigail Clayborne

abigail.jpgName: Abigail Clayborne

Major/Year/School: Bachelor of Business Administration with a Concentration in Accountancy and a Minor in Economics. Rising Junior. The George Washington University.

Position: Administrative (Accounting/HR) Intern

Past Internships: none

What drew you to an internship at IWPR?

I knew I wanted an accounting or business internship this summer to jumpstart my business career, but I wanted to be a part of an organization with a greater purpose than just crunching numbers. My internship at IWPR has allowed me to gain valuable business skills while also supporting and learning from a forward-thinking organization.

What does a typical day at IWPR look like?

Each day is different; I could be helping with next year’s budgets, managing accounts payable, or reconciling bank accounts. I love working with numbers and am always eager to take on a challenging problem!

What has been the best part of interning at IWPR so far?

Hands down, the people. Everyone here is incredibly intelligent and passionate about the work that they do. I am surrounded by some very talented and driven people who inspire me to work hard and learn as much as I can each day that I am here.

Any advice for future IWPR interns?

Make the most of your time at IWPR and jump at every available opportunity— you won’t realize how much you have learned and grown until you are done with your internship!

What are your future career interests?

I have just accepted an internship offer with PwC for next summer. I hope to stay with the firm after graduation and see where the opportunities take me!

Favorite lunch spot? CAVA— its fast, easy, and delicious. It doesn’t hurt that it’s only a block away either.

Favorite D.C. museum? The Air and Space Museum. I am still amazed by the fact that we are able to fly massive metal objects through the air!

Favorite podcast or reading material on your commute? I only have a 15 minute walk to work, but I love listening to some smooth Indie tunes on my way in.

What else do you like to do in your spare time? I am a cheerleader at GW, so I love meeting up with my teammates and working on stunts or new skills whenever we can!


Stay tuned throughout the summer as we highlight other IWPR interns and learn more about IWPR’s internship program here.

Intern Spotlight: Greg Nelson

Greg_Nelson 1.jpegName: Greg Nelson

Major/Year/School: Political Science, M.A. Candidate at Appalachian State University

Position: Research Intern

Past Internships: South Carolina Green Party

What drew you to an internship at IWPR?

Much of my tertiary education has centered around comparative politics and international relations. When I learned that IWPR was seeking to branch out from domestic politics and into the international arena, I saw an opportunity to use my experience to advance attainment of this goal while learning how to practically apply a feminist lens to public policy through the think tank medium.

What research areas do you focus on?

I focus on two areas. The first is in comparative transatlantic foreign policy of the United States and European Union member states. The second is the role of women in international relations. This research will be included in books that we hope to have published in 2018.

What has been the best part of interning at IWPR so far?

Amid millennia of oppression, women are increasingly entering leadership positions and proving themselves just as capable as men. IWPR serves as an example of this, with women rejecting the unequal societal status quo while actively working to promote positive change through scholarly collaboration. The best part about interning here is watching this process unfold and the spring of inspiration it provides.

Any advice for future IWPR interns?

Two things. Firstly, although you likely prefer one over the other, hone both your qualitative and quantitative research skills. It will prove useful academically, professionally, and in terms of personal development.

Secondly, maintain your idealism and engage in self-care. It is easy to get discouraged and frustrated in this field, but remember that exposing problems in society is the first step toward addressing them. Work hard, but know when to step away.

What are your future career interests?

After finishing my current degree program, I would like to work for a think tank or in human rights advocacy for a few years before pursuing a PhD.

Favorite lunch spot? D.C. is an incredibly diverse city with food seemingly from every region of the globe within walking distance of the institute. I’ve tried to mix it up: Afghan today, Cuban tomorrow.

Favorite D.C. museum? It’s a tie between the National Museum of American History and the National Air and Space Museum. I also recommend the African American History Museum. It is a profound experience that casts light on dark aspects of American history and emboldens one’s resolve in the struggle for equality.

Favorite podcast or reading material on your commute? I usually listen to Cam and Ray’s Cold War Podcast while browsing news and current affairs sources.

What else do you like to do in your spare time? I enjoy hiking, camping, discussing politics, and daydreaming about the ideal society.


Stay tuned throughout the summer as we highlight other IWPR interns and learn more about IWPR’s internship program here.