Statement from IWPR Staff on the Murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery

Statement from IWPR Staff on the Murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery

We mourn and condemn the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and the many others who have lost their lives to police violence and racial hatred. We send our heartfelt condolences to their families and the communities that have been impacted by the loss of their loved ones, and commit to working alongside them until there is justice.

The terror, racism, and differential treatment visited upon Blacks in the U.S. on a near daily basis at the hands of multiple systems—law enforcement, education, healthcare, and criminal legal system—are woven into the fabric of American society and culture. We can no longer turn away from the violence, and must commit to doing our part to create a more just and equitable country. Now is the time.

IWPR stands in solidarity with Black women and men, their families, and communities as well as with the protestors who have taken to the streets to demand reform, accountability, equal protection under the law, and above all justice.

We condemn the use of violence and inflammatory rhetoric against protestors. We condemn white supremacy, police brutality, the militarization of the police, and the structural racism embedded in the criminal justice, educational, and heath care systems that have led to instability in Black, Indigenous, and other communities of color.

Artwork by shirien.creates

As an organization, IWPR is responsible for producing much of the research and analysis focused on understanding the economic and lived realities of women and families. As such, we commit to the following:

1. Using intersectional and anti-racist frameworks and approaches in our research to not only understand outcomes, but the historic institutional and structural context for those outcomes as well. Beyond reporting data on Black women and their families and highlighting areas of need, we are committed to identifying connections between present-day outcomes and the legacy of slavery and white supremacy, institutional and structural violence, and the intersectionality of racism and misogyny, or misogynoir.

2. Leading with recommendations grounded in the lived realities and experiences of Black women, their families and other historically disenfranchised communities and that builds a more equitable society. We will work to change economic policies that exacerbate economic inequalities, deepen poverty, compromise educational attainment, increase health disparities, impede economic mobility, and criminalize Black people and their communities.

3. Creating a platform for the voices of Black women who are often silenced, in order to continue the dialogue around important themes highlighted by the protests such as racism, anti-blackness, and police brutality. We will actively partner with other Black leaders, experts, and organizations in our research to ensure we center the voices of Black women and their families.

4. Reflecting internally on our organizational practices, policies and culture to ensure that we do not unwittingly replicate the racialized hierarchies and power systems, injustices and inequities we seek to change. We affirm our commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion in recruitment, hiring, retention, and promotion as a means to provide meaningful professional growth opportunities for Black women, and women of color.

Our hearts are comforted and we are encouraged by the global outpouring of support for those on the frontlines fighting for racial and social justice, and a better world for all of us. To be certain, all oppression and discrimination are linked—the systems and structures that maintain racial privilege in society are the same systems and structures used to maintain gender, class, heterosexual and other kinds of privilege. We must all do our part to dismantle these systems and to create a more just and equitable world. ​

In Solidarity,

Nicole, Cyndi, Ryan, Ariane, Jeff, Valerie, Chandra, Federiga, Lindsey, Elyse, Susana, Erika, Lea, Erin, Anna, LaVonda, Tessa, Adiam, and Zohal

[Event Recap] Pathways to Gender Equality: Economic Gender Analysis Addressing Current and Future Challenges at American University, November 2-3 2018

[Event Recap] Pathways to Gender Equality: Economic Gender Analysis Addressing Current and Future Challenges at American University, November 2-3 2018

On November 2-3, 2018, IWPR and AU’s Program on Gender Analysis in Economics hosted a conference in Washington, DC, bringing together scholars, advocates, and media to discuss economic issues through the lens of race and gender. Attendees heard from many experts on the latest research that sheds light on the path to gender equality.

  • Read about the issues explored at the conference in a commentary for Ms. Magazine written by IWPR’s Kelly Jones and Elyse Shaw, “The Economic Pathways to Gender Equality.”

Watch the Opening Plenary: Diversifying the Discipline of Economics

 

The opening plenary featured a conversation among leading women in economics on how the field can diversify to bring in more perspectives from women and people of color. The panel was moderated by MacArthur Foundation’s Cecilia Conrad and included former chair of the Federal Reserve and current Distinguished Fellow in Residence at the Brookings Institution Janet Yellen, MacArthur Fellow Nancy Folbre, M.V. Lee Badgett of the University of Massachusetts, Maria S. Floro of American University, and Bina Agarwal of the University of Manchester.

  • Read coverage of Dr. Yellen’s remarks at the conference in The Wall Street Journal.
  • Read commentary for Ms. Magazine from IWPR’s Heidi Hartmann and American University’s Mieke Meurs, “Diversifying the Field of Economics is Critical to Achieving Gender Equality.”

Watch the Closing Plenary: Moving Forward—Immediate and Mid-Term Priorities

 

The closing plenary was moderated by IWPR’s Heidi Hartmann and included economists Kate Bahn of the Washington Center for Economic Growth, Caren Grown of the World Bank, Shahra Razavi of UN Women, and John Schmitt of the Economic Policy Institute discussing the short- and long-term policy priorities that can move the needle on gender equality in the United States and around the world.

Continue the conversation on social media with #Pathways2GenderEquality.

IWPR Update: Research Supports Wins for Austin Workers and Student Parents

IWPR Update: Research Supports Wins for Austin Workers and Student Parents

IWPR Analysis Informs Historic Sick Days Ordinance in Austin

In February, the Austin City Council passed an ordinance to require the city’s employers to provide paid sick days. The ordinance’s historic passage makes Austin, Texas, the first city in the South to guarantee paid sick days to workers. IWPR’s research on access to paid sick days in Austin and the costs and benefits of implementing the proposed ordinance informed city policymakers and coalitions, led by Work Strong Austin. IWPR study director Jessica Milli testified before the council on IWPR’s analysis, which found that implementing paid sick days in Austin would save the city’s businesses $4.5 million per year. Read coverage of this exciting development in The Texas ObserverNext City, the Austin American-Statesman, KUTThe Austin ChronicleThinkProgressand CityLab.

>>Read the briefing paperValuing Good Health in Austin, Texas: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Sick Days

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Proposed Trump Budget Includes Modest Increase in CCAMPIS Funding

The Trump Administration’s recently released proposed budget for fiscal year 2019 includes a modest increase in funding for the Child Care Access Means Parents in School (CCAMPIS) program—an important program that helps provide access to affordable child care for student parents—a reversal from last year’s budget proposal, which removed funding for the program altogether.

The Department of Education cited IWPR’s research on single mothers in college in the supporting documents justifying the department’s budget request, noting that, “One significant barrier to completion for low-income students and single parents is the lack of convenient and affordable quality child care services. In 2017, the Institute of Women’s Policy Research published a briefing paper concluding that single student mothers had, on average, over $6,600 in unmet need each year, more than $1,700 higher than the average need of non-parenting women in college, and $2,000 more than married mothers’ unmet need in 2012.

Read more about the Administration’s reversal on CCAMPIS in Refinery29, “Trump Reverses Plans To Cut Student Parent Support Program”

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What the Research Say: #FMLA25 and Paid Family and Medical Leave

What the Research Say: #FMLA25 and Paid Family and Medical Leave

Paid Leave Insurance Would Provide Vital Benefits at an Affordable Cost

photo-1494451930944-8998635c2123Since its signing on February 5, 1993, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) has been used millions of times by eligible workers to take up to 12 weeks of job protected, but unpaid, leave for their own serious health conditions, having a new child, or caring for seriously ill family members. On the 25th anniversary, IWPR released a new fact sheet showing that the proposed FAMILY Act would cost less than half of one percent of taxable payroll, while extending access to the economic, health, and social benefits of paid leave to millions of Americans.

>>Read the fact sheet

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25 Years after FMLA: Research Finds that Paid Leave is a Great Investment

Despite initial fears among skeptics that it would hurt business, protections guaranteed by the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)—passed 25 years ago this week—are now a cornerstone of U.S. employment law and human resource policy, providing peace of mind to millions of workers who have started families, faced serious illness, or cared for a loved one, all without hurting their employer’s bottom line. FMLA was step one. Almost three decades later, workers are still waiting for step two—paid family and medical leave.

>> Read the post by IWPR president Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., and Job Quality and Income Security Program Director Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D.

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

IWPR and American University’s Program on Gender Analysis in Economics Announce New Partnership

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) and American University’s Program on Gender Analysis in Economics (PGAE) are announcing a new partnership to collaborate on gender-focused research relevant for public policy. The new affiliation will support joint events, research projects, and the joint appointment of a research economist, who will have the opportunity to direct an academically rigorous, policy-oriented research program at IWPR and provide high-quality instruction in American University’s graduate and undergraduate programs.

President Heidi Hartmann says, “I am thrilled to partner with AU’s Program on Gender Analysis in Economics, an academic kindred spirit to IWPR’s policy-oriented approach.”

>>Read the full statement

[Call for Papers] Pathways to Gender Equality: Economic Gender Analysis Addressing Current and Future Challenges

PGAE and IWPR are pleased to announce a call for papers for a conference to be held on October 26 and 27, 2018, in Washington, DC, bringing together scholars and policy analysts who see gender analysis as central to solving the important economic issues–increasing inequality, global poverty, the increasing deficit of care. The conference seeks proposals for papers, panels of papers, round tables, and posters. Visit the IWPR website for a full description and to learn how to submit your proposal.

IWPR Recognized as One of Top Think Tanks in the United States

For the third year in a row, IWPR has been recognized as one of the top think tanks in the United States by the Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program (TTCSP) at the University of Pennsylvania, with recognition for its external affairs program and named a “think tank to watch.” Read the report and see the rankings on the TTCSP website.

NEW RESOURCES & COMMENTARY

National Stalking Awareness Month: Economic Impacts of Stalking

January 2018 marked the 15th observance of National Stalking Awareness Month. Stalking continues to affect nearly one in six women and more than one in 19 men in the United States in their lifetime. Research shows that the economic effects of stalking on victims are long-lasting. Wise policymaking would consider the economic impacts of stalking and how to better accomodate victims’ needs.

>>Read more on IWPR’s blog.

Is Your Campus Family Friendly? Data and Tools to Promote Student Parent Success–Webinar Recording Available

In case you missed our webinar, co-hosted with Endicott College, that reviewed new IWPR research on single mothers in college and provided an overview of Endicott’s Family Friendly Campus ToolkitUsing Data to Improve Outcomes, a self-assessment resource for higher education institutions that provides guidance on how to collect data about and from student parents, and for improving the availability of services that can help them succeed, you can access the full presentation and recording of the webinar on our website.

>>Watch full webinar

>>Download full presentation 

IWPR IN THE NEWS

#MeToo

MarketWatch | Next for #TimesUp and #MeToo: More women CEOs (February 4, 2018)

The Root | Playing the Blame Game: Consent Is Both Simpler and More Complicated Than You Think (January 21, 2018)

Bloomberg | As #MeToo Sweeps the World, Economics Profession Has Its Own Reckoning (January 18, 2018)

Equal Pay

NBC News | How women can close their own personal wage gap (January 29, 2018)

Marketwatch | What Rosie the Riveter would make today (January 28, 2018)

CNN Money | The words we use to talk about the gender pay gap (January 22, 2018)

USA Today | Pay gap: 48% of women say they have to work twice as hard as men to take home half the pay (January 18, 2018)

Hollywood Reporter | 3 Ways Women in Hollywood Can Negotiate a Better Deal (January 18, 2018)

CNBC | Michelle Williams reportedly got 1,000 times less than Mark Wahlberg—here’s how to ensure that won’t happen to you (January 10, 2018)

Future of Work

The Atlantic | Why Are Women Still Choosing the Lowest-Paying Jobs? (January 25, 2018)

Bloomberg | What the Gender-Pay Gap in Clothing Says About U.S. Wage Growth (January 25, 2018)

Bizwomen | Women pay the price for automation (January 24, 2018)

Student Parents

The Hechinger Report | A program helps low-income parents graduate at twice the rate of other community college students (February 5, 2018)

Nerdwallet | For Some Single Parents, Online College Holds the Key (January 30, 2018)

Educate (Podcast) | Nearly 1 in 5 female college students are single moms (January 16)

Paid Leave

Slate | The Anti-Trump Wave May Position Hawaii to Lead Way on Work-Family Policies (January 18, 2018)