Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of June 27, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


June 24, 2016

The Chronicle-Telegram: United Way Begins $1M Collaborative to Assist Single Moms

United Way of Greater Lorain County has committed nearly $1 million to help get single moms into higher-paying jobs. Over the next three years, the nonprofit will give $300,000 per year to fund a new collaborative called WE3 — Women Empowered, Educated and Employed. The group connects United Way and Lorain County Community College with 10 other nonprofit government and education organizations.

[…] Elyria Public Library director Lyn Crouse said women would often come in seeking these types of services, but until the collaborative formed, library staff didn’t know where to send them. “Unifying into one resource-sharing network with common applications, knowledge of each other’s programs and services, and the name of a contact person we can call directly to ask on a patron’s behalf is the best way to deliver customer satisfaction and truly help people,” she said.

June 23, 2016

GSA Business Report: Nonprofit gets $4 million grant for job training with child care

A Greenville nonprofit has received a $4 million U.S. Department of Labor grant that will be used to provide both free training and certification for advanced manufacturing jobs and child care for low-income parents in Greenville and Laurens counties. Family Footprint CEO and Founder Natalie Milom said a public-private partnership is starting the initiative that is expected to serve about 700 parents over the next four years.

Milom said the partnership includes advanced manufacturing employers, nonprofit organizations, child care entities…The Secure Families Initiative aims to “close the skills gap for advanced manufacturing companies by providing training and certifications at no cost to low-income parents who desire to work towards a career in this sector,” Milom said in a statement. She said the training “will prepare parents for middle to high-skill positions such as CNC machinists, mechatronics technicians, and welders.”

VT Digger: People’s United Community Foundation Awards $5,000 to Umbrella’s Transitional Job Training Program

Umbrella provides safety, support and services to women and families throughout Caledonia, Orleans and Essex Counties. The organization’s four primary programs offer domestic and sexual violence crisis and prevention, child-care resource and referrals, supervised visitation, and trauma-informed vocational training.

[…] “Job training programs and other support services are critical in helping individuals transition to self-sufficiency,” said Michael Seaver, Officer, People’s United Community Foundation and President, People’s United Bank, Vermont. “Umbrella does an incredible job of breaking down the barriers for low-income women and providing the necessary skills to be successful.”

June 17, 2016

Sun Sentinel: Community Training Group Gets $4 million Federal Grant

OIC of South Florida has received a $4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to help parents with child care so they can advance their careers through job training. […] OIC of South Florida in Oakland Park is a work force, job development and training center.

VT Digger: Vermont Tech Receives $4 Million Federal Grant for Manufacturing Training

The US Department of Labor grant, awarded to Vermont Tech on Tuesday, is the only grant awarded in the nation that will serve an entire state. The grant will help support the Vermont Supported Training Education and Employment Partnership (VSTEEP), a comprehensive, statewide, public/private partnership focusing on building innovative and evidence-based practices, systems and protocols to remove barriers faced by working, low-income Vermont families in accessing and succeeding in education and training to improve their job prospects and put them on a path to economic independence.

[…] VSTEEP partners will assist participants in addressing child care issues and other barriers to training and employment through navigation services, direct assistance and leveraging all available federal, state and private resources.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of June 13, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


June 15, 2016

CT Post: Federal grant aimed at helping workers with child-care needs

The WorkPlace has received a more than $3.4 million federal grant for a new initiative that will help parents trying to advance their careers to overcome their child-care barriers. The Bridgeport-based organization, which serves southwestern Connecticut, will use the U.S. Department of Labor funds to create a four-year “Strengthening Working Families” initiative.

[…]  The gap in this case is the difficulty finding child-care services for people trying to pursue career or educational advancement opportunities. “It’s to look at folks where family obligations serve as a barrier to pursuing opportunities that can lead to a career, a good job or better wages,” Carbone said. “It’s a terrible choice to have to make.”

June 14, 2016

The Commercial Appeal: Memphis Bioworks lands $4 million training grant for parents

Unemployed and underemployed parents in four Memphis-area counties in Tennessee will get short-term job training, coaching, placement, childcare and transportation support with a nearly $4 million federal grant announced today. The Memphis Bioworks Foundation will manage the grant, one of 14 totaling more than $54 million from the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Strengthening Working Families Initiative.” The grant targets parents in Shelby, Fayette, Tipton and Lauderdale counties. Training will be in advanced manufacturing, health care and information technology industries.

June 13, 2016

The White House: FACT SHEET: Government, Businesses and Organizations Announce $50 Million in Commitments to Support Women and Girls

The Department of Labor will award more than $54 million in grants to give working parents the ability to train for higher wage jobs while addressing barriers faced by those with child care responsibilities.  This will help working parents address key barriers to participating in and successfully completing training for middle-and high-skilled jobs in in-demand fields, as well as help bridge the gap between the workforce development and child care systems.  By leveraging additional public and/or private funding, the grants promote activities that address barriers to accessing training and employment including co-location of training and child care services; increased access through unconventional training delivery times or locations; flexibilities related to scheduling and child care exigencies; and improved access to child care and other related participant supportive services.  This more than doubles the grant awards previously announced as part of the Department’s Strengthening Working Families Initiative grant program.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of June 6, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


June 8, 2016

TribTalk: Texas needs a new approach to poverty

Their CareerAdvance program offers job training in the health care industry for parents, addressing and removing traditional barriers such as childcare, transportation and costs for books.

[…] Nonprofits do not necessarily have to expand their scope to move ahead with a two-generation strategy; indeed, this is most effective as a partnership between organizations. At ChildCareGroup, the nonprofit I run, we’re cultivating partnerships with groups that can help the parents of the low-income children we serve.

June 5, 2016

Wyoming Tribune Eagle: We all need to help Wyomingites be self-sufficient

Late last month, the Wyoming Women’s Foundation released two reports that should serve as both a wakeup call and a call to action for all Wyomingites.

[…] First, low-income residents need to expand their skills so they will qualify for higher-wage jobs. There are many ways to do this, from specialty job certificate programs at Laramie County Community College to the CLIMB Wyoming job training program for single moms. We believe much more can be done, though, including partnerships between the state’s community colleges and high schools to provide students not headed to college with training in technical programs that lead to higher-wage jobs right after graduation.

Jun 4, 2016

KSL.com: Rural Utah: ‘We owe it to them’ to break cycles of poverty

In November, the county and the nonprofit San Juan Foundation was one of 10 rural counties nationwide to receive a Rural Integration Models for Parents and Children to Thrive (IMPACT) demonstration grant.

[…] The goal of the San Juan United initiative is to reduce child poverty using a two-generation approach that serves children and parents together, largely focusing on educational opportunities for both. One goal envisions establishing one new quality preschool program within targeted Native American communities and one new licensed child care program by the end of this year. For adults, the initiative seeks to give parents the tools they need to achieve financial stability — financial literacy instruction, high school equivalency and postsecondary education opportunities, as well as job training keyed on workforce needs.

Courier-Post: Program brings education, skills to Camden youth

The 12-month program will offer 113 city residents educational assistance to get their high school diploma or equivalency, mentoring and social services, life skills training and job training — all thanks to a $1.9 million federal Department of Labor grant.

[…] Camden Corps Plus will offer its participants a high school equivalency, industry-recognized credentials in fields including culinary arts, certified nursing assistant, construction, customer service, technology and manufacturing. Work experience will come through paid internships and work sampling, and mentors and case managers will assist with challenges like child care, transportation, coping skills and financial literacy. Upon completion, participants will receive job placement assistance as well.

June 2, 2016

New York Times: Support Women to Support Communities

Last November, the New York Women’s Foundation joined 27 public U.S. women’s foundations and the Women’s Funding Network, in announcing a five-year, $100 million collective funding initiative that will pay for job training programs that are customized to the cultural and educational needs of low-income women and are aimed at securing higher-wage, stable jobs; programs that support women’s entrepreneurship and small business development; access to affordable high-quality child care so women can be successful in the workplace and children can have a strong academic start in life; and national research to inform best practices for increasing ec

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of May 30, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


May 31, 2016

Tuscon.com: Local chefs to cook up philanthropic feasts for Primavera

The foundation’s workforce development program, Primavera Works, provides job readiness training and job placement assistance. Salazar said it also offers a temporary staffing agency that serves as an alternative to predatory day labor practices by paying above-minimum wages in data entry and receptionist work, construction, custodial work, landscaping and manual labor positions.

Another program provides job training for veterans; Project Action for Veterans also offers wrap-around services and housing support for veterans and their families.

May 30, 2016

Santa Cruz Sentinel: Interfaith groups helps Homeless Garden Project in Santa Cruz

The Homeless Garden Project’s 3-acre organic farm near Shaffer and Delaware operates a community support agriculture program and other programs. Its leaders provide job training, short-term employment and support services to people who are homeless.

May 27, 2016

Lincoln Times-News: I-Care makes a difference through mentoring

Through job training, tutoring, education and a variety of support services, I-Care Inc. has been making a difference in the lives of people for more than 50 years.

[…] “Our focus is to utilize grant funding which is funded through Centralina Workforce Development Board for workforce development,” family support services director Shelton Moore said. “Skills training is the major focus and we complement that with work-based learning. The goal is to help people learn the skills they need that lead to sustained full-time employment.”

[…] “Transportation is one of the big ones. Many don’t have a vehicle and public transportation doesn’t even begin to touch the need. Many young people have a baby and that is a tremendous challenge. Many of them in the situation of trying to better themselves while raising a child are living on someone’s couch.”

May 26, 2016

Boston Globe: Multipronged approach is the only way to address homelessness

The administration’s plan to finance development of affordable housing and preserve existing affordable units couldn’t come at a better time, as Boston now has the fourth-highest number of people in homeless families of all cities in the United States.

The governor’s multifaceted approach demonstrates that this crisis must be addressed on several fronts In order to achieve real success and break the cycle of homelessness and poverty. A safe place to live is the foundation, but customized support services, including job training, education, health care, and child care, are also essential.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of May 23, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


May 24, 2016

Brookings: Employment and disconnection among teens and young adults: The role of place, race, and education

The following analysis and related interactive examine employment trends among teens aged 16–19 and young adults aged 20–24, and compares these groups with adults aged 25–54—those typically considered to be in their prime working years.

[…] Research suggests that youth employment programs with the following characteristics are most effective: They develop strong links between education, training, and the job market; focus on promoting healthy youth development; provide support services to address challenges such as childcare and transportation; offer opportunities for paid work closely aligned with or integrated into the program, and provide continuous support after job placement and program exit.

May 21, 2016

Florida Times-Union: ‘Hand up’: Jacksonville’s FreshMinistries connects people with ‘myriad of needs’ to services

When people in need seek employment assistance at FreshMinistries, the nonprofit’s own 10-week hospitality and certified nurse assistant training programs and a computer lab for job searches are among the options they are offered.

When they seek other kinds of job training, social and family services, financial literacy, youth programs, medical and mental health care, substance abuse treatment and educational opportunities — or all of the above — FreshMinistries’ Donell Neal provides guidance and a reassuring hand.

Neal runs the newly revived Direct Connect service at the nonprofit’s Weaver Center for Community Outreach near Jacksonville’s downtown sports complex. The free program connects low-income people with a range of services, some that are provided on site, others via referrals to other agencies.

May 20, 2016

The Philadelphia Tribune: Local Agencies Present Job Training Program

Philadelphia Works, the city’s Workforce Development Board, in collaboration with The Workplace, launched “Platform to Employment,” (P2E) a job training program for long-term unemployed (27 weeks or longer) residents of Philadelphia, at the PA CareerLink® Northwest Philadelphia Center, on May 11.

[…]“Platform to Employment aligns very closely with our federally-mandated directive to engage dislocated workers and those with barriers to employment. By providing a more comprehensive ‘wraparound’ approach to training and support, P2E significantly raises placement and retention rates, which ultimately benefits both the employer and career seeker with long-term, permanent employment.”

May 18, 2016

Your West Valley: Maricopa County, Surprise partner to support working low income families

Income eligible parents in Surprise and El Mirage will soon have access to a pilot program called Strengthening Working Families, which combines opportunities for workforce development training, childcare support and rental and utility assistance. The program, being piloted by the city of Surprise and Maricopa County, leverages Federal and State funds to support families in need by providing access to and coordination of the following services:

Workforce DevelopmentArizona@Work Maricopa County: Parents can participate in a free short-term job training program to enter a new career path or advance in their current career. Parents must meet income eligibility requirements and have children under the age of 5.

Child Care – Head Start/Early Head Start Partnerships: Head Start services will fill the child care need for eligible parents who are engaged in the program’s employment education and training activities. The child care will be provided at no cost.

Service Coordination – Community Action Program of Surprise: CAP of Surprise will provide long-term case management and service coordination to program participants. Parents will have a single point of contact to help them navigate through services that aim to support their efforts to increase their self-sufficiency as they improve work skills and increase income.

 

 

Segregation in Federally-Funded Job Training Programs Contributes to the Gender Wage Gap

by Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., and Asha DuMonthier

Women and men enter job training programs with similar goals in mind—they want to expand their skill set, increase their earnings, and support their families. However, there is a gender divide in the occupational areas for which women and men receive training, which contributes to to inequalities in men and women’s earnings. Women are more likely to receive training in managerial, technical, and professional occupations, as well as in service and sales and clerical occupations (Figure 1). Men, however, are much more likely than women to receive training in male-dominated occupations like construction and transportation, which tend to have higher earnings than female-dominated jobs. This gender segregation in training programs closely resembles patterns in the labor market as a whole, where women are 72.2 percent of office and administrative support workers, while men are 96.5 percent of installation, maintenance, and repair workers, and more than 97 percent of all construction and extraction workers.

Figure 1. Occupational Breakdown of Training for Adult Exiters, from April 2013 to March 2014

Figure 1 Blog

Source: IWPR compilation of data from Social Policy Research Associates 2015, Table III-21.

Gender segregation in job training programs has important implications for women’s long-term economic security. Data for adults who finished training programs funded by the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) between April 2013 and March 2014 show that while women were the majority of those who received intensive and training services (51 percent, Table II-10) and were, on average, in programs of longer duration than men (Table II-18), their average earnings after receiving WIA services were lower than men’s. In the fourth quarter after finishing adult programs, women who exited programs between July 2012 and June 2013 earned $5,296 compared with $7,188 for men (Table II-31). (Published data do not provide information on earnings prior to receiving WIA services and include all exiters, not just those with full-time earnings.)

Women earn less after completing job training programs in part because female-dominated occupations (occupations where women are more than 75 percent of the workforce) pay less than traditionally male occupations (occupations where men are more than 75 percent of the workforce). In a study of Perkins-funded CTE programs using data from the U.S. Department of Education and Bureau of Labor Statistics, women made up over 80 percent of participants in 2010 in postsecondary “Human Services” courses, which prepare students for low-paying service jobs such as Child Care Provider ($9.34 per hour on average) and Cosmetologist ($10.85 on average). In contrast, women were less than 10 percent of participants in “Architecture and Construction” courses, which train students for higher-paying jobs like Electrician ($23.71 per hour on average).

Multiple forces contribute to gender segregation in job training programs. One study found that counseling services may influence women’s decisions to pursue traditional female-dominated career paths. While many women in the study said that they were not interested in nontraditional skills, the number who reported that they were interested was greater than the number who were referred to nontraditional training. What is more, many of the women surveyed said that the career advice they were given did not include information on the likely wages and benefits of different occupations; had they known this information, they might have pursued nontraditional training.

Women pursuing career paths in male-dominated fields may also experience difficulties as a result of hostile work cultures or outright discrimination. In a recent IWPR poll of about 80 financial social workers, the most common explanation given for women’s low share of good-paying jobs in male-dominated fields was discrimination and a lack of a welcoming work and training environments. The scarcity of women in higher-skilled, male-dominated occupations may make women in those training programs and employment settings feel isolated and increase their chances of exposure to harassment and discrimination.

Because women are the primary or co-breadwinner in half of U.S. families with children, women’s lower earnings after completing training programs have serious consequences for families’ economic security. Encouraging women to pursue nontraditional fields through counseling and fostering welcoming and non-discriminatory environments in male-dominated fields are important steps to ending gender segregation in programs and increasing women’s opportunities to secure jobs that will provide economic stability for themselves and their families.

Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., is Associate Director of Research at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. Asha DuMonthier is a Mariam K. Chamberlain Fellow for Women and Public Policy at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research.

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of May 16, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


May 17, 2016

WisBusiness.com: Panel: Employers need to involve themselves in skills gap solutions

If Wisconsin fixes its long-term skills gap problem, it’s going to be because employers help students early to figure out their best career options, according to a WisPolitics.com panel. That’s already happening in several places around Wisconsin, said Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce President Tim Sheehy. But more and more employers need to help policymakers and schools ensure Wisconsin has enough skilled workers in the future, he said.

[…] It’s more than just technical skills, she added, noting that companies look for “soft skills” such as critical thinking. Colleges also need to help address the several obstacles students face outside of school, such as hunger and homelessness, she said. “We have to make sure that the students have the credentials they need,” she said. “But they need to have all those wrap-around support services and good career planning to really be a productive value employee.”

State of Reform: FamilyCare awards $532,000 in grants to support BH access

ADELANTE MUJERES: $24,237 for increasing food security for Latina women and their young children. The grant will benefit those living in western Washington County who are enrolled in classes such as GED Prep in Spanish, computer skills, job training, and parenting and personal growth classes. This program is intended to (1) Increase Latino Families consumption of fresh, local produce and, (2) Inform and refer participants to federal benefit programs in order to improve participants’ food security.

May 12, 2016

RGV Proud: Texas Veterans Commission Awards $300,000 Grant to Help Valley Veterans

The Valley Initiative for Development and Advancement (VIDA) announced that the Texas Veterans Commission through the Funds for Veterans Assistance program, awarded VIDA a $300,000 grant to provide educational and job training opportunities as well as supportive services for veterans in the Rio Grande Valley. The program name for this grant is VIDA for Veterans!

The TVC grant will allow VIDA to infuse its comprehensive wraparound support services program, which includes an intensive case management component that provides career pathway choices to underserved, unemployed, and underemployed Texas veterans, their surviving spouses and dependents (Beneficiaries) for all counties of the Rio Grande Valley.