What We’re Reading Today (8/28)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


IWPR IN THE NEWS

The New York Times

The Biggest Misconception About Today’s College Students

Gail O. Mellow, August 28

 

DOMESTIC POLICY

The New York Times

Why Medicare and Medicaid Can Outmatch Private Plans on Cost

Austin Frakt, August 28

 

The Wall Street Journal

Unemployment’s Steady Fall Could Signal Trouble—or a Broader Structural Shift

David Harrison, August 27

 

The Wall Street Journal

In St. Louis, a Rare Effort to Lower the Minimum Wage

Eric Morath, August 27

 

The Washington Post

Some say people on disability just need to get back to work. It’s not that easy.

Terrence McCoy, August 27

 

The New York Times

Closing a Racial Divide, One Swim Lesson at a Time

Vivian Wang, August 27

 

CULTURE

Refinery 29

Insecure Stars Say Black Women’s Equal Pay Gap Is Everyone’s Problem

Judith Ohikuare

 

OPINION

The Washington Post

No, millennials aren’t killing stable employment

Danielle Paquette, August 28

 

The New York Times

Unemployment in Black and White

NYT Editorial Board, August 28

 

The New York Times

The Secret to a Good Robot Teacher

David DeSteno, Cynthia Breazeal and Paul Harris, August 26

 

The New York Times

Two Lessons in Prejudice

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh, August 26

What We’re Reading Today (8/25)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


DOMESTIC POLICY

The New York Times

As Coding Boot Camps Close, the Field Faces a Reality Check

Steve Lohr, August 24

 

The Economist

Does ageing explain America’s disappointing wage growth?

August 24

 

Huffington Post

What It’s Like To Be A Teen In The U.S. Who Can’t Afford Tampons

Eleanor Goldberg, August 25

 

The New York Times

Will the Republican Tax Bill Be Aimed at the Economic Past, or the Future?

Neil Irwin, August 25

 

Glamour

Uber Is Donating $1.2 Million to Girls Who Code

Maggie Mallon, August 24

 

The Washington Post

Golden parachutes for presidents of public colleges with thin budgets

Jon Marcus, August 25

 

INTERNATIONAL

The Economist

Are men more irrationally exuberant than women?

August 24

 

LOCAL

The Washington Post

Researcher’s fight to close achievement gap irked school board for years

Jay Mathews, August 25

 

OPINION

 

The Washington Post

Don’t fall for the misinformation campaign against Title IX reforms

Chad W. Dunn, August 24

 

The Washington Post

Making a dent in student debt with ‘Freshman Year for Free’

Michelle Singletary, August 24

 

The New York Times

The Worst (and Best) Places to Be Gay in America

Frank Bruni, August 25

What We’re Reading Today (8/24)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


DOMESTIC POLICY

The New York Times

Pregnant and Far from Home, a Sisterhood of the Expecting

Kirk Johnson, August 24

 

The Wall Street Journal

Sexual-Harassment Scandals Lead to Tough Conversations in Silicon Valley

Yoree Koh, August 24

 

Market Watch

One theory why income inequality has grown in America

Jacob Passy, August 24

 

Market Watch

U.S. jobless claims inch up from 6-month low

Greg Robb, August 24

 

Huffington Post

The Problem With Shutting Down Abortion Clinics In Rural And Low-Income Areas

Jenavieve Hatch, August 23

 

The Washington Post

Federal prisons must now provide free tampons and pads to incarcerated women

Michael Alison Chandler, August 24

 

Market Watch

Student loan company accused of delaying debt forgiveness for teachers and social workers

Jillian Berman, August 23

 

The New York Times

Even With Affirmative Action, Blacks and Hispanics Are More Underrepresented at Top Colleges Than 35 Years Ago

Jeremy Ashkenas, Haeyoun Park, and Adam Pearce, August 24

 

The New York Times

How Redlining’s Racist Effects Lasted for Decades

Emily Badger, August 24

 

The New York Times

Military Transgender Ban to Begin Within 6 Months, Memo Says

Julie Hirschfeld Davis, August 23

 

The New York Times

Federal Judge Rejects a Revised Voter ID Law in Texas

Manny Fernandez, August 23

 

CULTURE

The New York Times

In Movies and on TV, Racism Made Plain

Wesley Morris, August 23

 

The New York Times

‘Girls Trip’ Writers Make Movie History — and Influence It, Too

Yamiche Alcindor, August 23

 

OPINION

The Washington Post

Bend the trend: Reviving unionization in America

Jared Bernstein, August 24

 

The Washington Post

Trump’s claim that he, himself, created 1 million jobs as president

Glenn Kessler, August 24

 

Glamour

Study Insists That Men Have Just As Much Work-Life Stress as Women, and I’m Not Here For It

Hillary Kelly, August 23

What We’re Reading Today (8/23)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


IWPR IN THE NEWS

Market Watch

We need to talk about ‘hot’ female economists

Jillian Berman, August 22

 

NPR

An Air Force Cadet At 25: A Sign Of The Times In Higher Education

Elissa Nadworny, August 23

 

DOMESTIC POLICY

Variety

The Fight for Equal Pay: Women, Minorities on TV Still Making Less Than White Men

Daniel Holloway, August 22

 

Glamour

Even Artificial Intelligence Is Sexist

Suzannah Weiss, August 22

 

Huffington Post

There’s Nothing Subtle About The Sexism In Tech

Emily Peck, August 22

 

Market Watch

We need to talk about ‘hot’ female economists

Jillian Berman, August 22

 

Huffington Post

Georgia Woman Claims She Was Fired Because Of Her Period

Alanna Vagianos, August 22

 

Glamour

These 22 College Students Will Change Your Perspective on What It’s Like to be a Young Woman in America Right Now

Ashley Edwards Walker, Jessica Militare and Kate Friedman, August 23

 

Teen Vogue

Atlanta Could Elect a Queer Muslim Woman for the First Time

Emma Sarran Webster, August 22

 

The New York Times

Labor Wants to Make Nafta Its Friend. Here’s the Problem.

Eduardo Porter, August 22

 

The Washington Post

Virginia parents to receive free baby boxes, part of a campaign to promote safe sleep

Michael Alison Chandler, August 23

 

Market Watch

Young middle-class adults spend their money (to help them in job interviews)

Maria Lamagna, August 23

 

LOCAL

The Washington Post

The hard work of school reform is paying off in the District

WaPo Editorial Board, August 22

 

OPINION

The New York Times

Why I Refuse to Avoid White People

Chloe Valdaray, August 22

 

The Washington Post

Where do we learn that poverty is shameful and dangerous? At the movies.

Stephen Pimpare, August 23

 

The Washington Post

Want to see proof of institutional racism? Let weed open your eyes.

Courtland Miloy, August 22

 

The Wall Street Journal

Right-to-Work Sore Losers

WSJ Editorial Board, August 22

What We’re Reading Today (8/22)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


IWPR IN THE NEWS

The Root

Black Women and Girls May Run the World, but They’re Not Safe in It

Andre Perry, August 22

 

DOMESTIC POLICY

The Wall Street Journal

How Retiring Baby Boomers Hinder U.S. Wage Growth

Eric Morath, August 21

 

USA Today

Bro culture is under attack, but women say it’s far from tamed

Marco della Cava and Kevin McCoy, August 21

 

USA Today

‘Delivery economy’ creates wave of low-wage jobs

Kellie Ell, August 22

 

Market Watch

Only 37% of Americans believe today’s children will grow up to be better off

Alessandra Malito, August 22

 

The New York Times

Sex Education Based on Abstinence? There’s a Real Absence of Evidence

Aaron E. Carroll, August 22

 

INTERNATIONAL

The New York Times

A New Tune on Women’s Rights in the Arab World
Shereen El Feki, August 22

 

Glamour

Could Gossip Be Causing Teen Pregnancy?

Shay Maunz, August 21

 

Jezebel

Chilean Court Votes To Ease Total Ban On Abortions for the First Time In 30 Years

Lauren Evans, August 21

 

OPINION

Cosmopolitan

I Almost Died During Childbirth. I’m Not Alone.

Rachel Stuhler, August 21

 

USA Today

Voices: I write about race because … We are not your slaves!

Ricky Jones, August 22

 

The New York Times

Why Is the Fed So Scared of Inflation?

NYT Editorial Board, August 22

 

The New York Times

Live in a Poor Neighborhood? Better Be a Perfect Parent.

Emma S. Ketteringham, August 22

 

The Washington Post

Abstinence-only education doesn’t work. We’re still funding it.

John Santelli, August 21

 

The New York Times

Let Consumers Sue Companies

Richard Cordray, August 22

 

The Washington Post

3 in 10 strong Trump supporters accept or are indifferent to white supremacist views

Philip Bump, August 22

 

VACATION INSPIRATION

The New York Times

The Wonder Women of Botswana Safari

Hillary Richard, August 22

What We’re Reading Today (8/21)

Each morning, IWPR’s @landewatson compiles articles on gender, race, economics, and other policy issues IWPR staff want to know about. See below for what we’re reading today. (Note: articles included do not necessarily reflect the views of IWPR’s staff.)


DOMESTIC POLICY

The New York Times

How Hate Groups Forced Online Platforms to Reveal Their True Nature

John Herrman, August 21

 

The New York Times

Fat Bias Starts Early and Takes a Serious Toll

Jane Brody, August 21

 

Glamour

Pregnant Meteorologist Gives Powerful Response to Body-Shaming on Air

Suzannah Weiss, August 21

 

The Washington Post

Labor groups step up pressure on Trump to deliver

David Weigel, August 20

 

Glamour

3 Women Who Quit Their Jobs at Google Share Stories of Workplace Racism and Sexism

Tess Kornfield, August 19

 

DC LOCAL

The Washington Post

Baltimore uses trauma research to improve life for poor parents and their children

Mark Beckford, August 20

 

The Washington Post

Homeless LGBT youth find a place to call their own in D.C.

Madhumita Murgia, August 19

 

INTERNATIONAL

The Washington Post

Child labor: The inconvenient truth behind India’s growth story

Josh Jacobs and Reeva Misra, August 21

 

OPINION

The New York Times

What Will Trump Do to American Workers?

Paul Krugman, August 21

 

The Washington Post

What do black Americans have to lose? Under Trump, we’ve already lost a lot.

Cedric L. Richmond, August 21

 

The Wall Street Journal

The Teamsters’ Impunity

WSJ Editorial Board, August 20

 

The Washington Post

Racism doesn’t exist all by itself, it has support.

Tom Toles, August 18

 

Cosmopolitan

Men Need to Stop Telling Women to “Take a Joke”

Jennifer Wright, August 20

 

ECLIPSE NEWS

The New York Times

The Solar Eclipse: What to Expect

NYT, August 21

Charlottesville: An Imperative to Intensify Action toward Equity

Charlottesville: An Imperative to Intensify Action toward Equity

The recent “Unite the Right” events in Charlottesville saw the mobilization of violent individuals by organizations working to exploit hate and fear in an effort to advance white supremacy.  The emboldened white nationalist movement in the United States requires redoubled efforts to address racism in America in all its forms, from structural racism and inequitable public policies, to outright terror.

As an organization focused on how intersections of gender, race, and ethnicity affect opportunity, safety, and prosperity, we feel it is an important time to examine what we know about the status of women of color in our society, and to consider how policy can work toward equity and move away from policies that reinforce racism.

The Status of Black Women in the United States and the Status of Women in the South reports present social and economic indicators, illustrating how women, White women, and women of color are doing in comparison with White men. These reports also provide the indicators and additional data on a state-by-state basis and can help inform action toward humane policies motivated by principles of equity.

Findings like these can help to focus action in unsettling times:

  • Women who work full-time, year-round earn less than similarly-employed men. In the South, the site of recent violent racist incidents, women earn 70% of what White men earn, 4 percentage points lower than in non-southern states.
  • The poverty rate among women in the South l (16.4 percent) is nearly 20 percent higher than in all other states outside the South (13.7 percent). Among women from the largest racial and ethnic groups in the South, Black women have the highest poverty rate at 25.5 percent, followed by Hispanic (23.4 percent) and Native American women (20.9 percent). For perspective, the poverty rate among men in the South is 12.2%.
  • Nationally, Black women are two and a half times more likely to be murdered by men than are White women. South Carolina has the highest murder rate in the country at 2.32 per 100,000 women—nearly double the national rate.
  • Young Black women aged 18-19 were four times more likely to be imprisoned than young White women. Girls and women of color are the fastest growing populations in American prisons.
  • In the South, median annual earnings for U.S.-born women are 28 percent higher than earnings for immigrant women.

Despite challenges, Black women and other women of color have consistently been at the front of the social justice movements, pushing for social and policy changes that benefit society as a whole.

In recent months, false narratives have succeeded in altering public debate and policy leaving evidence-based rigor behind. Grounded in evidence and democratic values, voices that seek openness, tolerance, and equity must be raised and strengthened.