Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of November 7, 2016


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Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Gladys McLean

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


November 9, 2016

The State Journal-Register: Goodwill launches employment program for veterans

Land of Lincoln Goodwill Industries has established a VetLink employment program for military veterans, including referrals to financial, educational, transportation, childcare and housing services.

Land of Lincoln President and CEO Sharon Durbin said in an announcement the program is a natural extension of the Goodwill job-training mission.

[…]The program provides one-on-one career guidance, including job-skill evaluations, setting employment goals, and developing education and training programs. Veterans who complete the program also will be helped with professional clothing for interviews, according to the announcement.

The Pasadena Journal: Saving Our Young Black Men – Connected Youth to Jobs

The Pasadena Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. recently concluded the inaugural Saving Our Young Black Men Job Skills Training Program – Connecting You to Jobs. The program targeted 18-21 year old young men (and women). It focused on providing skillsets that they need for life long success. The concept of this program is to hold a hand out to give a hand up.

[…]The Job Skills Training Program, taught by Casswell Goodman, gets our young adults ready for the job market by teaching them how to fill out effective job applications, put together job winning resumes and learn how to successfully interview in order to win jobs. The free program provided each participant that completed the training with a free suit, a $25 gift card and the opportunity to test and certify through the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce to have access to a database of over 600 jobs.

November 4, 2016

Herald and Review: Now they’re cooking: Homeless men get much-needed job skills from culinary class

Bernard Sangster was looking for a new direction for his life when he got out of jail this summer.

So the offer he got while staying at the Salvation Army was too good to pass up, and that was to enroll in the shelter’s Culinary Arts Program that started Aug. 31. Sangster said he knew his way around a barbecue grill but didn’t know anything else about cooking.

Part-way through the eight-week class, he earned his food service sanitation manager certification and landed a job running the broiler at Cheddar’s.

[…]Two previous eight-week sessions produced 13 graduates, 10 of whom were able to earn that all-important certification. Six did so this time around, and the remaining three plan to take the test again Nov. 18.

Two other graduates, in addition to Sangster, found jobs while taking the training.


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Our Work Continues

Tuesday’s election results sparked a wide range of responses across the nation and the world. Here at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, our commitment to using information to advance women is stronger than ever. This election season, with its turmoil, contentiousness, and disappointments, surfaced and amplified issues that require a hard look at how policies affect people who differ by gender, race, age, and experiences.

The election season powerfully raised the issues of sexual assault and sexual harassment, implicit and explicit bias, women’s leadership, and inequality in ways that our research can and will continue to build upon.

Over its nearly 30 years, IWPR has brought timely, unassailable research to bear on the great policy challenges that face our country, including access to paid family leave, child care, equal pay, and freedom from violence, across administrations and policy cycles and in states and localities throughout the nation. After Tuesday’s election, for example, residents of two more states, Washington and Arizona, will have access to paid sick days, and IWPR is proud of how its data has played a role in these advances.

IWPR takes heart that over the coming months and years, we will have the honor and opportunity to work alongside policymakers and activists to ensure that well-informed policy solutions are put forward, championed, and implemented.

Facts and reliable data seemed hard to come by during this election cycle, and false statements were difficult to quickly correct. IWPR’s founding mission is to ensure that policies are not based on misleading information or outdated assumptions. Today, we roll up our sleeves, still believing that knowledge is power, a renewable energy that cannot be exhausted or extinguished. We will look for ways to harness that power, together, as we bring our research to bear on the challenges that continue to face us.

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