Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of September 26, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


September 29, 2016

11 Alive: City of Refuge to receive $7 million pledge to improve Westside

This donation will allow City of Refuge to develop economic growth on Atlanta’s Westside by implementing an innovative jobs hub. The hub will teach residents of the area people skills to prepare for careers in auto tech, retail, the culinary arts, landscaping, security services and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) installation and repair.

City of Refuge is a nonprofit that provides assistance to women and children facing homelessness. The program provides emergency shelter, hot meals, healthcare, activities for children and vocational training.

September 28, 2016

Midtown Patch: Major Job Training Program Headed to Westside

In a joint press conference, the Chick-fil-A Foundation, the Coca-Cola Foundation and the city said the City of Refuge, an Atlanta nonprofit, will use the funds to build a jobs hub that will teach skills in auto tech and retail, the culinary arts, landscaping, security services and HVAC. A computer-coding academy will be created for young adults along with a small business incubator and accelerator for entrepreneurs.

September 27, 2016

JustMeans: She Builds: Giving Women the Confidence and Skills to Maintain a Safe and Healthy Home

She Builds is a nationwide event series, created by Rebuilding Together, featuring community revitalization projects that create real change for women – providing critical home repairs and community restoration to women in need, while giving women the confidence and skills to maintain a safe and healthy home. She Builds is held in collaboration with Rebuilding Together affiliates in local cities; as well as corporate and community partners.

[…] In June, we joined with our Nashville affiliate and HGTV for She Builds Nashville. The event brought HGTV talent and country music stars together with local volunteers to restore Thistle Farms, a sanctuary helping women survivors of abuse, addiction, trafficking and prostitution by providing them with a safe place to live, counseling, job training and other basic life skills and services.

Western Nevada College: Academy Offers an Accelerated Start to Construction

That’s where Western Nevada College and its Construction Gateway Academy come into play. The seven-month-old academy prepares men and women for entry-level positions to assist subcontractors and general contractors. The academy also lays the foundation for them to fill a larger role in the construction industry.

“This program sets them up to have the skills to get a decent-paying job ($12-$20) right out of high school, as well as one year ahead of their peers toward a bachelor’s degree,” said WNC Construction Instructor Nigel Harrison. “Not only will they learn the basics of construction, but they will be gaining skills in communication (written and verbal) and also possess the ability to speak intelligently —  talk shop — with employers.”


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

5 Things to Know in Advance of Tonight’s Debate

In advance of tonight’s first presidential debate, IWPR helps you get up to speed on these five top women’s policy issues:

  1. Improving Women’s Access to Good Jobs Can Narrow the Wage Gap
  2. A College Affordability Challenge: Declining Availability of Campus Child Care
  3. The Significance of the Gender Wage Gap; Wages among Women of Color are Especially Low
  4. Breadwinner Mothers are Common in Every State, but Policies Need to Catch Up
  5. The Evidence-Based Case for Paid Sick Days and Paid Leave Policies

 

1. Improving Women’s Access to Good Jobs Can Narrow the Wage Gap

>> Read the report, Pathways to Equity: Narrowing the Wage Gap by Improving Women’s Access to Good Middle-Skill Jobs or the Executive Summary. 

Half of the gender wage gap is due to women working in different occupations and sectors than men. Improving women’s access to good middle-skill jobs—in growing sectors, such as manufacturing, IT, and transportation—can help close the wage gap and improve women’s economic security.

pathways-website
Click to visit womenandgoodjobs.org

Visit womenandgoodjobs.org, to read the report and explore an interactive, searchable database of middle-skills jobs, which helps users identify pools of skilled women workers who could be tapped to fill shortages, ensuring that the economy benefits from the talent of its whole workforce.

2. A College Affordability Challenge: Declining Availability of Campus Child Care

>> Read the briefing paper, Child Care for Parents in College: A State-by-State Assessment

As nearly 5 million undergraduate students raising children return to college this fall, a new IWPR state-by-state and national analysis finds that campus child care is declining in 36 states across the country, and that many states have rules making it difficult for students to get child care subsidies.

For the nearly 9 in 10 (88 percent) student parents living in or near poverty, paying for child care can be an insurmountable obstacle. IWPR’s analysis finds that, rather than assisting students with the high cost of child care, 11 states require college students to also be employed to be eligible for child care subsidies. In 3 states—Arizona, Kentucky, and Washington—parents are required to work at least 20 hours per week in addition to attending school, an amount proven to diminish rates of college completion among students overall, in order to be eligible for subsidies.

3. The Significance of the Gender Wage Gap; Wages among Women of Color are Especially Low

>> Read IWPR’s New Resources on Pay Equity & Discrimination, including Five Ways to Win an Argument about the Gender Wage Gap

IWPR’s updated fact sheet clarifies the most common myths about gender wage gap statistics. IWPR’s researchers note that a pay gap of 79.6 percent accurately describes the pay inequality between men and women in the labor force and reflects a variety of different factors, including: discrimination in pay, recruitment, job assignment, and promotion; lower earnings in occupations mainly done by women; and women’s disproportionate share of time spent on family care, including that they—rather than fathers—still tend to be the ones to take more time off work when families have children.

In fact, the annual wage ratio of 80 percent is actually a moderate estimate of gender pay inequality. Women of color fare much worse, with Black women making 63.3 percent of what White men earn per year and Hispanic women making 54.4 percent.

gwg-social
Click to share this image on Twitter

In addition, IWPR has found:

  • Women earn less than men in almost every occupation and are four times more likely than men to work in jobs with poverty-level wages.
  • If current trends continue, women will not receive equal pay until 2059, according to a related IWPR analysis of trends in earnings since 1960.
  • If women earned the same as comparable men—men who are of the same age, have the same level of education, work the same number of hours, and have the same urban/rural status—poverty among working women would be cut in half and the US economy would grow by $482.2 billion.

4. Breadwinner Mothers are Common in Every State, but Policies Need to Catch Up

>> Read the quick figures, Breadwinner Mothers by Race/Ethnicity and State

A new IWPR national and state-by-state analysis of breadwinner moms finds that four in five Black mothers and two in three Native American mothers are breadwinners, compared with fewer than half of White and Asian/Pacific Islander mothers. Breadwinner moms are either raising children on their own or contributing at least 40 percent of a married couple’s earnings. The majority of Black, Native American, and Hispanic breadwinner moms are single and raising a family on their own, while the majority of White and Asian/Pacific Islander breadwinner mothers are married.

As the share of breadwinner mothers increases, another IWPR analysis found that women’s wages fell 1.6 percent between 2004 and 2014, with Black, Native American, and Hispanic women’s earnings falling around three times as much as women’s earnings overall. (Read the analysis with state data for Black women and Native American women.)

5. The Evidence-Based Case for Paid Sick Days and Paid Leave Policies

>> Read the briefing paper, Paid Sick Days Benefit Employers, Workers, and the Economy

Four in 10 American workers lack access to paid sick days, with access less likely among Hispanic workers and workers in low-wage and food service jobs. A recent IWPR briefing paper compiles all available social science and policy research, which show that paid sick days are associated with benefits to employers—including reduced contagion in the workplace, improved productivity, decreased workplace injuries, and lower employee turnover—and employment benefits to workers, including greater job stability and labor force attachment.

>> Read the report, Paid Parental Leave in the United States: What the Data Tell Us about Access, Usage, and Economic and Health Benefits

Another IWPR report compiles available research and data on the access to paid parental leave and the benefits of such a policy. A growing body of research suggests that paid family leave increases labor market attachment, economic security, and the health and welfare of families and children, and has the potential to help businesses thrive, reduce spending on public benefits programs, and promote economic growth and competitiveness.

Follow @IWPResearch on Twitter and Facebook.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of September 19, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


September 22, 2016

Cleveland.com: Nonprofit opens preschool in Cleveland’s Glenville neighborhood: Cleveland Connects: The First 2,000 Days

The nonprofit Centers for Families and Children has opened an early learning center in Cleveland’s impoverished Glenville neighborhood to serve 40 preschoolers for free.

[…] The Centers for Families and Children is a nonprofit that offers low-income families job training, mental healthcare, rent assistance and childcare. Centers also operates the Wade Early Learning Center on Yale Avenue in Glenville.

News Channel 3: One group is empowering and uplifting the community one bag of tea at a time

“My Cup of Tea” is a new business that only hires women in the neighborhood. The Women’s Resource Center or the “house” at the corner of Semmes and Carnes is a place where women in Orange Mound can connect to improve the quality of their lives.

[…] Now through their “Work for Life” and “Tea Life” programs, women can learn valuable work skills and possibly land a job in their community. What we’re doing is training women to specialize in the packing and the labeling and the distributing of imported tea.”

September 21, 2016

Herald Democrat: Workforce Solutions celebrates 20 years in the community

Among the programs offered through Workforce Solutions are job skills training through local colleges and childcare assistance programs for working parents, Bates said. In the past year, Workforce Solutions assisted in providing nearly $3 million in subsidized childcare services.

“Our main goal is to remove barriers that keep people from going to work,” Bates said, citing transportation and childcare as the biggest barriers. Workforce Solutions is among the 28 workforce development boards that were created by in the mid-90s by the Texas legislature.

September 20, 2016

The Kansas City Star: Dog grooming program gave homeless woman a job – and a new life

Using a training course called “The Grooming Project,” EPEC [Empowering the Parent to Empower the Child] helps women claim a path out of poverty. Students train Monday through Thursday, mostly working with two instructors on pets brought in by customers for a $12 wash and clip.

[…] If the women could become certified pet stylists, improve their employment status, make a living wage and learn to manage their lives socially, emotionally and financially, EPEC would succeed. “It’s not just job training like at a vocational college,” Kirsch said. “You still need to have all of those wrap-around services.”

[…] Besides teaching dog grooming skills, life skills are also taught and has partner with other organizations to provide housing assistance, child care and job placement support.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of September 12, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


September 14, 2016

PR Newswire: WTIA Workforce Institute Officially Opens Registered Tech Apprenticeship Program, Apprenti, with First Participants in Initial Training Round

The WTIA Workforce Institute today announced the opening of its registered apprenticeship program, Apprenti, the only tech apprenticeship accredited by the State of Washington and a first for the industry. Apprenti will recruit, train, and place at least 600 new tech workers during the pilot. The program focuses on under represented groups including women, minorities and veterans, helping bridge the skills and diversity gap and providing trained talent to the state’s high-wage tech sector. Apprenti officially kicks off today and is currently accepting applications for its first round of participants this fall. The WTIA Workforce Institute also announced that Apprenti will receive an additional $200K in funding from JP Morgan Chase to cover the costs of training its first participants.

September 9, 2016

The Circle News: Measure twice, cut once: carpenters and Summit Academy students

Summit Academy (SAIOC) offers 20-week job training programs that ready students for apprenticeships and internships in the construction trades or in healthcare and medical-related career positions.
The program offerings vary during the year, Shedivy said.

[…] OICs (Opportunities Industrialization Centers) were started in 1964 by theologians serving primarily Black Americans in depressed and under-served areas. The OIC of America network organization, based in Philadelphia, says there are currently 38 affiliate organizations in 22 states “fighting for economic and racial justice through workforce development of underserved and underrepresented communities.”

[…] The national organization said 24 responding affiliate programs reported nearly 12,000 men and women have trained in their programs, and 10,000 of them completed technical education requirements – an 87 percent completion rate despite personal and economic hardships.

September 1, 2016

Carmichael Times: Women’s Empowerment Gains Grant from US Bank Foundation

Women’s Empowerment’s initial eight-week program for women who are homeless in Sacramento provides women with free onsite child care in the group’s child development center and transportation assistance. Each woman works with a master’s level social worker to address her root causes of homelessness, attending classes on job-readiness, confidence and empowerment. She receives health services, focuses on job readiness with her employment specialist and volunteer career mentor, and learns financial literacy. When she graduates after eight weeks, she can access Women’s Empowerment’s graduate services at any point in her life, which include certifications, counseling, GED preparation, access to a professional clothing closet, financial literacy, and paid job training through the group’s Get A Job Kit Training and small business.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org