Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of June 27, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


June 24, 2016

The Chronicle-Telegram: United Way Begins $1M Collaborative to Assist Single Moms

United Way of Greater Lorain County has committed nearly $1 million to help get single moms into higher-paying jobs. Over the next three years, the nonprofit will give $300,000 per year to fund a new collaborative called WE3 — Women Empowered, Educated and Employed. The group connects United Way and Lorain County Community College with 10 other nonprofit government and education organizations.

[…] Elyria Public Library director Lyn Crouse said women would often come in seeking these types of services, but until the collaborative formed, library staff didn’t know where to send them. “Unifying into one resource-sharing network with common applications, knowledge of each other’s programs and services, and the name of a contact person we can call directly to ask on a patron’s behalf is the best way to deliver customer satisfaction and truly help people,” she said.

June 23, 2016

GSA Business Report: Nonprofit gets $4 million grant for job training with child care

A Greenville nonprofit has received a $4 million U.S. Department of Labor grant that will be used to provide both free training and certification for advanced manufacturing jobs and child care for low-income parents in Greenville and Laurens counties. Family Footprint CEO and Founder Natalie Milom said a public-private partnership is starting the initiative that is expected to serve about 700 parents over the next four years.

Milom said the partnership includes advanced manufacturing employers, nonprofit organizations, child care entities…The Secure Families Initiative aims to “close the skills gap for advanced manufacturing companies by providing training and certifications at no cost to low-income parents who desire to work towards a career in this sector,” Milom said in a statement. She said the training “will prepare parents for middle to high-skill positions such as CNC machinists, mechatronics technicians, and welders.”

VT Digger: People’s United Community Foundation Awards $5,000 to Umbrella’s Transitional Job Training Program

Umbrella provides safety, support and services to women and families throughout Caledonia, Orleans and Essex Counties. The organization’s four primary programs offer domestic and sexual violence crisis and prevention, child-care resource and referrals, supervised visitation, and trauma-informed vocational training.

[…] “Job training programs and other support services are critical in helping individuals transition to self-sufficiency,” said Michael Seaver, Officer, People’s United Community Foundation and President, People’s United Bank, Vermont. “Umbrella does an incredible job of breaking down the barriers for low-income women and providing the necessary skills to be successful.”

June 17, 2016

Sun Sentinel: Community Training Group Gets $4 million Federal Grant

OIC of South Florida has received a $4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to help parents with child care so they can advance their careers through job training. […] OIC of South Florida in Oakland Park is a work force, job development and training center.

VT Digger: Vermont Tech Receives $4 Million Federal Grant for Manufacturing Training

The US Department of Labor grant, awarded to Vermont Tech on Tuesday, is the only grant awarded in the nation that will serve an entire state. The grant will help support the Vermont Supported Training Education and Employment Partnership (VSTEEP), a comprehensive, statewide, public/private partnership focusing on building innovative and evidence-based practices, systems and protocols to remove barriers faced by working, low-income Vermont families in accessing and succeeding in education and training to improve their job prospects and put them on a path to economic independence.

[…] VSTEEP partners will assist participants in addressing child care issues and other barriers to training and employment through navigation services, direct assistance and leveraging all available federal, state and private resources.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of June 13, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


June 15, 2016

CT Post: Federal grant aimed at helping workers with child-care needs

The WorkPlace has received a more than $3.4 million federal grant for a new initiative that will help parents trying to advance their careers to overcome their child-care barriers. The Bridgeport-based organization, which serves southwestern Connecticut, will use the U.S. Department of Labor funds to create a four-year “Strengthening Working Families” initiative.

[…]  The gap in this case is the difficulty finding child-care services for people trying to pursue career or educational advancement opportunities. “It’s to look at folks where family obligations serve as a barrier to pursuing opportunities that can lead to a career, a good job or better wages,” Carbone said. “It’s a terrible choice to have to make.”

June 14, 2016

The Commercial Appeal: Memphis Bioworks lands $4 million training grant for parents

Unemployed and underemployed parents in four Memphis-area counties in Tennessee will get short-term job training, coaching, placement, childcare and transportation support with a nearly $4 million federal grant announced today. The Memphis Bioworks Foundation will manage the grant, one of 14 totaling more than $54 million from the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Strengthening Working Families Initiative.” The grant targets parents in Shelby, Fayette, Tipton and Lauderdale counties. Training will be in advanced manufacturing, health care and information technology industries.

June 13, 2016

The White House: FACT SHEET: Government, Businesses and Organizations Announce $50 Million in Commitments to Support Women and Girls

The Department of Labor will award more than $54 million in grants to give working parents the ability to train for higher wage jobs while addressing barriers faced by those with child care responsibilities.  This will help working parents address key barriers to participating in and successfully completing training for middle-and high-skilled jobs in in-demand fields, as well as help bridge the gap between the workforce development and child care systems.  By leveraging additional public and/or private funding, the grants promote activities that address barriers to accessing training and employment including co-location of training and child care services; increased access through unconventional training delivery times or locations; flexibilities related to scheduling and child care exigencies; and improved access to child care and other related participant supportive services.  This more than doubles the grant awards previously announced as part of the Department’s Strengthening Working Families Initiative grant program.


To view more of IWPR’s research, visit IWPR.org

Job Training and Support Services In-The-News: Week of June 6, 2016

Weekly Roundup of the news on women and supportive services in job training programs.

By Asha DuMonthier

Job training can provide an entry into family-sustaining jobs and careers. Many women in job training programs, however, face obstacles to success. Wraparound services—such as child care assistance, access to public benefits, and transportation or housing assistance—can help adults, particularly those with caregiving responsibilities, to complete programs that will ultimately improve their economic standing.


June 8, 2016

TribTalk: Texas needs a new approach to poverty

Their CareerAdvance program offers job training in the health care industry for parents, addressing and removing traditional barriers such as childcare, transportation and costs for books.

[…] Nonprofits do not necessarily have to expand their scope to move ahead with a two-generation strategy; indeed, this is most effective as a partnership between organizations. At ChildCareGroup, the nonprofit I run, we’re cultivating partnerships with groups that can help the parents of the low-income children we serve.

June 5, 2016

Wyoming Tribune Eagle: We all need to help Wyomingites be self-sufficient

Late last month, the Wyoming Women’s Foundation released two reports that should serve as both a wakeup call and a call to action for all Wyomingites.

[…] First, low-income residents need to expand their skills so they will qualify for higher-wage jobs. There are many ways to do this, from specialty job certificate programs at Laramie County Community College to the CLIMB Wyoming job training program for single moms. We believe much more can be done, though, including partnerships between the state’s community colleges and high schools to provide students not headed to college with training in technical programs that lead to higher-wage jobs right after graduation.

Jun 4, 2016

KSL.com: Rural Utah: ‘We owe it to them’ to break cycles of poverty

In November, the county and the nonprofit San Juan Foundation was one of 10 rural counties nationwide to receive a Rural Integration Models for Parents and Children to Thrive (IMPACT) demonstration grant.

[…] The goal of the San Juan United initiative is to reduce child poverty using a two-generation approach that serves children and parents together, largely focusing on educational opportunities for both. One goal envisions establishing one new quality preschool program within targeted Native American communities and one new licensed child care program by the end of this year. For adults, the initiative seeks to give parents the tools they need to achieve financial stability — financial literacy instruction, high school equivalency and postsecondary education opportunities, as well as job training keyed on workforce needs.

Courier-Post: Program brings education, skills to Camden youth

The 12-month program will offer 113 city residents educational assistance to get their high school diploma or equivalency, mentoring and social services, life skills training and job training — all thanks to a $1.9 million federal Department of Labor grant.

[…] Camden Corps Plus will offer its participants a high school equivalency, industry-recognized credentials in fields including culinary arts, certified nursing assistant, construction, customer service, technology and manufacturing. Work experience will come through paid internships and work sampling, and mentors and case managers will assist with challenges like child care, transportation, coping skills and financial literacy. Upon completion, participants will receive job placement assistance as well.

June 2, 2016

New York Times: Support Women to Support Communities

Last November, the New York Women’s Foundation joined 27 public U.S. women’s foundations and the Women’s Funding Network, in announcing a five-year, $100 million collective funding initiative that will pay for job training programs that are customized to the cultural and educational needs of low-income women and are aimed at securing higher-wage, stable jobs; programs that support women’s entrepreneurship and small business development; access to affordable high-quality child care so women can be successful in the workplace and children can have a strong academic start in life; and national research to inform best practices for increasing ec